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TORCH 



Spring Hill College 
Mobile, Alabama 
Volume 65 




Spring Hill College 

4000 Dauphin Street 

Moble.AL 36608 

Volume 66 





ON THE 
ROCKS 

o_ 

Call them traditions, rituals, whatever you want, but if 
you ask why, the answer is usually something like, 
"that's the way it's always been." 

Well, as the 1986-87 year unfolded, it became clear 
that many parts of life at Spring Hill weren't going to 
stay that way for much longer. 

As soon as students returned in August the small 
differences began to be felt. It was suggested for par- 
ties with alcohol be held off campus, and in fact, 
Powder Puff moved from the cafeteria to the Admiral 
Semmes Hotel. Rumors abounded and phrases like 
"increased liability" and "responsible drinking" were 
heard all over school. Statistics showed 66 percent of 
all students were under legal drinking age. What was 
the alcohol policy? Would SHC go dry? 




SPRING HILL 

COLLEGE 



Left: St. Joseph's Chapel has been a beautiful symbol of Spring Hill 
College and the surrounding community. The Chapel is 
representative of the tradition of Spring Hill's Catholic heritage, as 
well as the standards set by a Jesuit college. 

Photo by Mike Mathews 




STRAIGHT 
q UP 

I^M^pring Hill did not go dry, January 1, 
1987. Nevertheless, the concerns and ner- 
vousness remained. Many students were not 
quite sure what input they had on many 
issues, and few took time to find out. 

However, as negative as it all seemed, life 
at SHC was not constant conflict. Student 
Government worked all year to make Mardi 
Gras 1987 a reality, and Spring Hill in Venice 
moved closer to opening. A new national 
sorority was bom on campus, and Greek 
Day with the Albert P. Brewer citizens was a 
moving success. And we were all proud 
when a former Springhilliam was part of the 
crew to "yank" back the America's Cup. 

Our world was changing, we knew that. 
But what role we played in this period of ad- 
justment was an individual choice. Some 
campaigned, many complained. It was the 
year for tradition to meet transition. 





Photo by John Wolfarth 




CAMPUS 

Fasten your seatbelts, we're going bye-bye, 

LIFE 



When Student Life did a statistical study, it 
was revealed that the average age for a 
Spring Hill student was 19. It was also 
discovered that 66 percent of all students were 
under the legal drinking age. 

Therefore, when policy and precedent were 
being set, you had to remember that legally 
two-thirds of the campus could not drink. Some 
wondered if on-campus drinking would 
become a thing of the past. Others found the 
whole issue too hard to swallow. 

Nevertheless, there was some life in Campus 
Life, though you had to look harder to find it. 
With fewer parties scheduled, the call came for 
more non-alcoholic events. Few materialized. 

Were we adults behind the wheel of our 
future, or children in car-seats? We knew to be 
given responsibility we had to prove we could 
handle it. We also knew our campus life was 
changing for good. What we did not know was 
where we were going. 



JPW 

Below: The revamped Oktoberfest included games, food, and an 
afternoon concert. Tracy Driscoll braved the early morning hours to 

roll the keg for her team. 




Loft: Laurie Oester describes 
the importance of Campus 
Ministry during Parents' 
Orientation. 



SHOW 86' was a grand 

PREMIERE 



A trail of Badger paw prints ap- 
peared on the stretch of sidewalk from 
the Quadrangle and wound their way 
up the slight incline, around a tree, 
and through the main entrance of the 
Campus Center. The Badger trail was 
just a hint that Spring Hill Orientation 
Week, S.H.O.W., was about to begin. 

New students were met by the 
S.H.O.W. committee who directed 
them to the Business Office, the 
residence halls, or the school iden- 
tification lines. Students were later in- 
troduced to peer counselors who 
helped to guide them through 
academic testing and advising. 

Other activities of the week, includ- 
ed a campus tour in the form of Cam- 
pus Quest, Parents' Orientation, a 
comedy show, Coffeehaus, performed 
by S.H.O.W. staff, and a beach trip. 

John Wolfarth, S.H.O.W. chairper- 
son, discussed some of the changes 
made for S.H.O.W. 1986, "I'm glad I 
was there." "After careful reviewing of 



the past schedule, the committee 
wanted to apply the academic re- 
quirements, as well as social needs in 
the S.H.O.W. schedule." He added, 
"We wanted the students to get to 
know one another and the up- 
perclassmen who came back early to 
work with them." 

Another area the committee attemp- 
ted to improve upon was the Jesuit in- 
volvement in the program. "To in- 
crease Jesuit activities, we incor- 
porated a daily mass at noon, and a 
closing mass into the schedule," 
Wolfarth said. 

Wolfarth felt that the week went 
well. He said that S.H.O.W. received a 
positive response from student evalua- 
tions. "The evaluations showed that 
the students recognized the degree of 
effort that we put into the program and 
that was kind of nice." 



Below: Orientation can be hectic for parents as 
well as students. Becky Williams helps the 
parents of Tyrone Fayard to relax in the 
Parents' Hospitality Room. 



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Above: Moving in can be one of the most 
unpleasant experiences in the first days of col- 
lege. However, Jill Janick gets help from her 
parents to make the move easier. 
Left: Spencer Gillen, S.H.O.W. committee 
member, introduces a new student to Spring 
Hill. 

Photos by David Wagoner 



Right: Although the freshmen have never won the game. 
Missy O'Connell attempted to get past Sharon Moore and 
Joan Lund for a touchdown. 

Below: The Powder Puff game is a traditional event for the 
Upperclassmen to stage against the Freshmen. Phoebe 
Miller, Beanie LoBuglio, and Tracy Driscoll discuss the 
game plan with Coach Todd Thayer. 




Photo by Babs Dufour 









Left: After surviving the game, 
Julie Moll takes Mike Clarke to 
the Powder Puff Dance. 



'or Freshman Women, Powder Puff is 

MOT JUST A GAME 



To incoming freshmen, the 
hrase Powder Puff provokes vi- 
ions of translucent powder clinging 
3 a cotton ball. That was before 
iey realized the significance of 
lose two words at Spring Hill Col- 
sge. As rumors began to fly, the in- 
ocent visions of a flag football 
ame changed to visions of broken 
iris dancing in plaster casts. Some 
onsidered psychiatric care to undo 
le trauma incurred by the upcom- 
lg game. Could reality possibly be 
:s terrifying as the anticipation? 

When the morning of October 
jurth dawned, the freshmen were 
:s ready as they could be. Amidst 
le chaos of pre-game, plays were 
sviewed, cheers were practiced, 
:nd wan cheerleaders were given 
ist minute make-up tips. Finally, 
iced by their imminent demise, the 
eshmen began to find spirit and 
ncouragement from each other. 



The long-awaited game began, and 
although the freshmen fought valiant- 
ly, scoring one touchdown, the ex- 
perience of the upperclassmen ruled, 
ultimately leading them to victory. 

At the dance, hosted by the Inter- 
Sorority Council, freshmen and up- 
perclassmen alike sported bruises, 
rather than casts. The teams buried 
their misgivings and joined together in 
celebration of the reality of Powder 
Puff being exceedingly better than the 
anticipation. 



by Karen Waddick 

Above: Cheering is usually women's work. 
However, the freshmen men got into the act dur- 
ing the Powder Puff game. They are: Nick Yian- 
nopoulous, Pat Feehan, Steven Perrault, John 
McMahon, Tim McNair, Russ Barakat, Ted 
Lander, and Ed Hardin. 




11 




Brother versus Sister on the 

HOME FRONT 



Visions of palm trees started the in- 
vasion. The balmy weather attracted 
more of the outsiders, luring them to 
the sleepy college in the South. An in- 
vasion has occurred at Spring Hill Col- 
lege. It is not an invasion of armies 
from a hostile country, but of students 
from the great white North. 

Some northern students, such as 
Carolyn "Sam" Nieman of St. Louis, 
were attracted by the academic stan- 
dards. "I applied because of the 
academic reputation, and then re- 
ceived a scholarship." Although 
Nieman enjoys the weather, her heart 
is still in the Midwest. "I miss the pass- 
ing of the seasons," she said, "I wish it 
would get a few degrees colder in the 
winter." 

Another student from St. Louis, Jim 
Adams, was lead to Spring Hill 
because he wanted to go to a school 
with palm trees on the campus. 
However, Adams, as well, as other 
students have found that the pleasant 
climate is not the only benefit of living 
in the South. Many have realized that 
southern people also reflect warm 
personalities. 

Tammi Cramer, a Connecticut 
native, felt the people were friendlier 
in the South. Adams added, "People 
are friendlier. They are also very 
proud of their culture and dialect." 



The southern accent has long been 
the object of jokes, with entire volumes 
dedicated to the subject. Some visiting 
northerners like the southern dialect, 
while others find it repulsive. Common 
expressions such as "y'all" and "fixin' 
ta do" confuse northerners. The feel 
"you guys" is the correct phrase used 
when referring groups, and that one 
should be going to do something. 

Southern food is another area which 
seems almost foreign to northerners. 
Food such as black-eyed peas, fried 
okra, and Louisiana crawfish are not 
found in the upper regions of the 
United States. John Schlezinger is 
especially fond of southern food. "I like 
food that is unique to Louisiana," he 
said. 

The southern students feel they are 
fortunate to have the opportunity to 
meet and learn from northern 
students. Leslie Carr, Louisiana 
native, felt this was positive for the 
school. "I think it's great for the north 
and south to get together. It's helped 
me to know more types of people." 



by Mark Hunt 

RIGHT: Southern hospitality has been recog- 
nized as being special for many years. 
Marianne Currie plays a perfect southern belle 
to northerner Tom Caron. 



12 




13 



Left: Keith Hammett closes 
the show at the Oktoberfest 
afternoon concert. 

Photo by Eliseo Pitty 




A party that was most 

APPROPRIATE 



Oktoberfest was far from the 
festivities in the German heritage, and 
was even a wider gap from what 
Spring Hill students have come to ex- 
pect from the celebration. There were 
many factors which led to the change 
according to Spencer Gillen, Student 
Government Association Entertain- 
ment chairperson, and Archie Ander- 
son, Director for Student Activities. 
Anderson and Gillen both felt that the 
planning behind the event atempted 
to put more emphasis on the 
Oktoberfest games on Library Field, 
and the outdoor concert which fol- 
lowed. "The mud pit was not at 
Oktoberfest this year because it was 
dangerous," Gillen said. "We didn't 
want anyone to get hurt." An effort 
was also made to take the emphasis 
off alcohol at Oktoberfest. 

To make-up for the loss of the mud 
pit, an obstacle course which put 
teams through the rigors of breaking 
water balloons, stacking boxes, diving 
through shaving cream, and riding a 



tricycle to the finish, all without break- 
ing an egg which was carried through 
the entire course. Anderson said the 
games were a concept of the Enter- 
tainment committee. "We were just sit- 
ting around one day and thought up 
these events," he said. 

Following the games, an outdoor 
concert was performed by three dif- 
ferent bands, all Spring Hill students. 
The Knights of Columbus and Sigma 
Beta Phi sold pretzels and shrimp to 
the hungry audience throughout the 
show. 

Despite a few complaints about lack 
of publicity and the new format, 
Anderson and Gillen felt the event 
was a success. "Oktoberfest is still 
changing," Gillen said, "But we're 
hoping to improve it more every year." 



Right: Finishing the obstacle course for his 
team. Randy Mathews cradles an egg as he 
scoots his tricycle to the finish line. 
Below: The teams make themselves dizzy as 
they circle kegs in the keg relay at the 
Oktoberfest games. 



14 




Photos by John Wolf arth 




15 



Right: The greased balloon throw 

is a difficult event for even 

experienced teams. Spencer Gillen ►/•fljKt < 

grabs his balloon too hard and gets 

doused. 



Right: Yanking on the rope in the 

Greek Week rug-o-war, Deanne 

Neyrey tries to keep the Gammas 

out of the mud. 

Photos by David Wagoner 







16 



After parties, 
and games, 
Greek Week ended 




ON A VERY SPECIAL NOTE 



Greek / 'grek/ n 1. a person of 
Greek descent 2. the language used 
by the Greek 3. a member of a Greek- 
letter fraternity or sorority. 

Week / 'wek/ n 1 . one of a series of 
7-day cycles used in various calen- 
dars 2. any seven consecutive days 3. 
a week appointed for public recogni- 
tion of some cause. 

You may have your own definition 
of "Greek Week." That's alright, 
because each of the nine fraternities 
and sororities probably have their 
own definition of Greek Week, too. 

The first ever Greek Week was held 
on campus in November. We saw the 



Greek-letter organizations coming 
together for a week-long agenda of 
social and service programs. The two 
major objectives were to extend good- 
will to the campus community and to 
promote the Greek system. 

The week was highlighted with a 
service project involving the citizens of 
the Albert Brewer Developmental 
Center of Mobile. At this event, each 
organization hosted a small group of 
special citizens in a "Mini-Special 
Olympics." Other activities included 
social parties, a volleyball tourna- 
ment, a greased balloon toss, and 
tug-o-war. 



By Archie Anderson 




TOP: One event in the games was a frisbee toss. 
Phoebe Miller and Lee Diplacido help a 
participant. 

LEFT: The Mini-Special Olympics gave students 
the opportunity to get to know each other as well 
as the Albert Brewer residents. Peggy Savage, 
Erin Brennan, Marian Tucei, and Kristen Habert 
congratulate a heat winner. 



17 



Second Annual 
Health Fair Put A 

FOCUS ON 
WELLNESS 

The 1980's were the age of physical 
fitness and awareness. The Student 
Health Service was no exception to 
this national trend. Mary York, Direc- 
tor of Health Service and College 
Nurse Practitioner, sponsored the se- 
cond annual health fair in January of 
1987. The services offered par- 
ticipants included blood typing, 
blood sugar analysis, pulmonary func- 
tioning analysis, computerized 
lifestyle analysis, and information on 
many types of health issues. 

Nurse York felt the health fair was 
started to educate students, faculty, 
and staff on health issues. "The Health 
Fair's a screening process. We try to 
make people aware of their health to 
promote wellness, as well as to help 
people change their lifestyles," she 
said. 

In planning the Health Fair, Nurse 
York received help from the Health 
Advisory Committee, her student ad- 
visors. "The Committee deserves all 
the credit they can get," Nurse York 
said. "They were my right arm in 
organizing the Fair," she added. 

Overall, Nurse York felt the event 
went well, with the most popular 
feature being the pulmonary function 
test. Nurse York is now looking for- 
ward to the third annual health fair. 
"We expanded so much from the first 
to the second fair, I don't know where 
we will put the third fair." 




TOP: Wincing as she gets her blood sampled, Robyn Stinnett gets her blood 

typed by a Red Cross volunterr. 

ABOVE: Volunteer Pam Rosen adjusts the eye chart, as she checks Caffa 

Montgomery's eyes during the Student Health Fair. 



18 




LEFT: University of South Alabama 
Respiratory Therapy student, Duane 
Mathews's measures Simon Con- 
dron's lung capacity with the 
pulmonary function test. 



19 








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2.0 



eautiful Garden 
edicated with 

\ PRAYER FOR PEACE 



In the spring of 1 987, a new garden 
as added to the Jesuit cemetery. This 
:ea, known as the Peace Garden, 
as dedicated to Steven Karopczyc, a 
Dring Hill alumnus. Karopczyc, was 
lied in Vietnam in 1967. 
President and Rev. Paul S. Tipton, 
J., dedicated and blessed the Peace 
arden which is also the new location 
r Sodality Chapel, as well as the 
onument for Karopczyc. 



p - 



The monument, which is a large, 
bronze and granite sun dial, was 
given to the Garden by members of 
the Class of 1965. 



LEFT: Rev. Paul S. Tipton, S.J. gives 7 a.m. Mass 
regularly in Sodality Chapel, a part of campus 
life, since 1850. 

FAR LEFT: The sun dial which was dedicated to 
Spring Hill alumnus, Steven Karopczyc. 
BELOW: Sodality Chapel and the monument as 
they appear in the Peace Garden. 




. .'*. • ' •- * -" 



21 




i With SGA working 
1 to improve, the 

1 new Marcli Gras 
; lived happily, 

EVER 
AFTER 



Once upon a time, in the kingdom of 
Mobile, there was a Hill. At the top of 
the Hill, subjects lived in peace and 
harmony. Until one day, in the year 
nineteen hundred and eighty-six, a 
horrible thing overtook the royal sub- 
jects. The subjects of the Hill throw a 
party. There were parades with many 
colors, there were jesters and mystical 
spirits — and the King and Queen 
were happy. But that day brought with 
it the Crewe of Chaos. And with them 
came evil spirits and darkness. 

The psuedo gods were Mad! They 
puffed smoke and rained fire. And it 
was decreed that no more days of 
festivities and frolicking would occur 
at the Hill. 

The people of the Hill were sad, and 
the King and Queen went away while 
the Crewe was banished from the 
Kingdom. Certainly, someone could 
help. 

Finally, the Princes and Princesses 
of the Student Government Associa- 
tion came to the salvation of the Hill. 
They planned and worked on various 
strategies to please the psuedo gods 
and wanted their day of merriment 
back. After much work and struggle, 
the psuedo gods accepted the SGA's 
wishes. 

Myth, Magic, and Madness ruled 
the day, while Lazy Daze and Kevin 
Danzig Band played musical melodies 
by which they all rejoiced. The parade 
was loud and full of life. The day was 
exceptional and nothing 




iLJi 



22 




ft . 







TOP LEFT: The Excelsior Band has been in- 
volved in Spring Hill's Mardi Gras for as long as 
the Mardi Gras' tradition. 

TOP CENTER: The crowd braved rain 
throughout the Mardi Gras celebration. The 
band, "Lazy Daze," stayed dry under a canopy 
outside of the College Inn. 

FAR LEFT: The Parade's Grand Marshall, Rev. 
Roy "Chief" Vollenweider has long been a 
beloved member of the "Kingdom on the Hill." 
NEAR LEFT: The Knights of Columbus and 
Ladies Auxiliary's Arabian Knights float follows 
the Parade to the Mardi Gras celebration. 



23 




could put a DAMPER on the events. A 
new King and Queen were adorned 
and their court toasted to the bands, 
the SGA, the trees, the rain, the hour, 
the College Inn, and ... To The Court. 
Once again they lived in peace and 
harmony at the Top of the Hill. And 
they lived happily ever after. 

February 21 and 22, 1987, were 
days that defeated the idea that Mardi 
Gras would not exist at Spring Hill. 
The SGA planned and prepared a 
tremendous proposal that could not be 
refused. The day is marked as one of 




the best Mardi Gras in Spring Hill's 
history. Despite the rain, over 200 peo- 
ple remained to enjoy the festivities. 
On that day, God did shower His 
blessing on us all! 
Thanks SGA for a job well done! 



By Miriam Ackels 

TOP: Erin Brennan and Rob Dukes, Court 
Members, help the band start the party at the 
Mystical Magical Masquerade Ball. 
RIGHT: King Jordi Guso and Queen Miriam 
Ackels enjoy the Mardi Gras Concert. 
BELOW: Court Members, Michele Zoghby and 
Jaime Betbeze throw trinkets to the "peasants" 
during the Mardi Gras Parade. 












24 




25 




More students 
than ever before 
have a Weekend 



WITH MOM AND DAD 



Picture this, it's a Spring Saturday in 
full bloom, 65°, and you are about to sit 
down to a picnic, except for one catch. 
See, you're not the only one having 
lunch, and well, this is no ordinary pic- 
nic. You've got two hours to feed 850 
people. 

Sound impossible? Not for Judy 
Masten, Director of Alumni and Parent 
Activities. For the organizer of Parents' 
Weekend, held March 13-15, the fried 
chicken version of the miracle of 
loaves and fishes was just another in 
a long strand of unique challenges. 
These challenges, thanks to the 
careful planning, became pearls of 
wisdom which produced an outstand- 
ing weekend. 

How far ahead of time does one 
begin organizing a special event such 
as Parents' Weekend? "I joined the 
staff in September, and planning had 
already started," Marsten said. "The 
date was set nine months in ad- 
vance," she added. 

Publicity on the weekend was a tri- 
fold process. Keeping Parents In- 
formed, a Parents Association 
newsletter, created by Marsten, first 
announced the weekend three months 
in advance. The countdown began 
and two months before the weekend, 
a postcard reminder was mailed. 
Registration materials went out one 
month in advance. The results were 
overwhelming. With 489 people 
registered, nearly one third of all 
students had relatives in attendance. 
An increase of 157 from the previous 
year. 

Highlights from the weekend, in- 
cluded a "very successful" Saturday 



morning parents meeting, ^nens' and 
womens' tennis matches, and a Sun- 
day Mass. "It was very nice for 
parents to be able to go to Church with 
their child," Marsten said. 

Though it started out as a special 
event, Marsten admits Parents' 
Weekend grew to be much more. On 
that kick-off Friday, polishing off lasl 
minute details, she looked up from her 
desk and out towards the Badger's 
Den. A student was walking along the 
road when suddenly a station wagon 
pulled up and stopped in the middle of 
the street. A woman barely had time to 
get out of the car before the student 
had reached her, waving, hugging, 
and smiling. A mother wanted to say 
hello to her child and she was willing 
to stop traffic to do it. At that point, 
Judy Marsten realized that what she 
had organized was not just a special 
event, but an opportunity for parents 
and children to be reunited and to 
spend time together. "Before that, I 
didn't realize the full impact and im- 
portance of what I was doing. It truly 
is a worthwhile project." 



By John P. Wolfarth 

TOP LEFT: During receptions, parents have the 
opportunity to discuss issues informally with the 
Rev. Paul S. Tipton, S.J. One parent, takes ad- 
vantage of the opportunity. 
RIGHT: Enjoying pleasant spring weather, Dr. 
Ben Shearer shares lunch with Jackie Martin 
and her family. 



26 




27 




Many disappointed Graduates missed their 

WALK DOWN "The Avenue" 



The Commencement Exercises of 
1987 will be one the graduates, 
students, and parents will never 
forget. Many of us have looked for this 
day for four long years, and some 
even longer. Because of a sudden 
change in rain plans, Graduation was 
held at a different time and place, St. 
Joseph's Chapel. Several Graduates 
even missed the ceremony. 

We, the graduates, were never ap- 
plauded by the faculty, staff, and Ad- 
ministration, in front of the Library. We 
were denied the pleasure of hearing 
"Pomp and Circumstance" being 
played during Commencement. To 
add, our Commencement speaker, Dr. 
John Hafner, was not allowed to 
deliver his speech to the class of 1987. 
But the hardest thing for any graduate 
to ignore was the anticipated walk 
through the Avenue of the Oaks, as a 
union, with our family, friends, and 
classmates watching. We really 
wanted this one. 

Even though the "happiest day of 
our lives" was not up to our expecta- 
tions, we must not dwell on it. We 
should think back to February 21, 



1987, and remember the Mystic, 
Magic and Madness of Mardi Gras 
1987. 

To this class, and to the entire col- 
lege, this day proved to be the most 
memorable day Spring Hill College 
has seen. The frolic and chaos of 
King Jordi Guso and Queen Miriam 
Ackels, the royal court, and the stu- 
dent body, listening to the Danzig 
Band in the rain, was unbelievable. 
This truly was the most memorable 
day in the last four years for our 
class. 

To all of you, I wish you well in 
the future and hope you will cherish 
the moments we have shared as 
part of the "Spring Hill Experience." 
Next year, I will welcome you back 
to our alma mater, not only at a reu- 
nion of old friends, but also in a 
meeting of alumni at the "Second 
Annual Alumni Party," on the 
Avenue of the Oaks. Maybe, it too 
will be hosted by Father Tipton and 
appropriate beverages will be 
served. 

By Michelle Zoghby 




28 




ABOVE: Kelen Vorbach, Beau Gaudet, Rich 
Dukes, and Monica Davidson await the 
beginning of Graduation. 

LEFT: Grace Kelly (center) shows off her newly- 
received diploma. 

FAR LEFT: Food was in abundance at the 
Senior Luau. Todd Thayer, John Larkin, Anton 
Garriz and Martha Fuchs load up their plates at 
the Oyster Boat. 



29 




30 



ACADEMICS 

Wait. Is this anXorY day? 



The answer to that question was 
crucial. With an alternating schedule 
like ours, walking into the wrong 9:30 
(on the wrong day) could be 
academically as well as socially 
embarrassing. 

But figuring out the X/Y schedule 
was not the only intellectual endeavor 
to challenge our minds during the 
1986-87 year. That was an old task, 
and our year was filled with newer 
(and not so trivial) pursuits. 

The ranks of the computer literate 
were increased when students took a 
byte out of word processing through a 
special one credit hour course. For the 
first time, every student who had taken 
a computer course was awarded an 
account on the VAX, free of charge. 

There were other nouvelle offerings 
on our course menu well. Commercial 
Art and Graphic Design was brought 
back into the Fine Arts curriculum, but 
half of the interested students had to 
be turned away due to lack of studio 
space. 

And a certain group of students 
(and profesorre) had un appuntamen- 
to importante every Y day at 1:00 with 
Father Viscardi. The class was 
Elementary Italian I, and many in the 
class hoped to be one of the chosen 
few (32 to be exact) when Spring Hill in 
Venice opened in January of 1988. 



JPW 



LEFT: The processional during Convocation. 



31 



In its' 446 year, 
Members of the Society of Jesus 

continue to give 

THEIR LIVES TO 
SERVE OTHERS 



September 27, 1987 will mark 447 
years of exciting life for the Society 
of Jesus — "the Jesuits." The years 
have not been lean ones in 
challenges. In Her relentless pursuit 
of excellence in the apostolic life for 
the greater glory of God, the Society 
has experienced many transitions, 
many passages from reality to 
reality. And, for all the changes, she 
still today cherishes and lives her 
high ideals. It is a legitimate ques- 
tion to ponder how the Society has 
faced the inevitable changes 
through the years without sacrific- 
ing Her essential vision and vitality. 

The principal reason, perhaps, 
lies in the Jesuit Constitutions, that 
nourishing document authored by 
the founder of Jesus, Ignatius 



Loyola. These Constitutions 
develop and codify the concept, im- 
plicit throughout the whole life and 
dreams and previous writings of Ig- 
natius, the concept, namely, of an 
authentic, integrally apostolic 
religious life — a life of selfless ser- 
vice of others in answer to the call 
of Jesus Christ, the risen Lord. 

The Constitutions are flexible, 
capable of bending without break- 
ing in the changing times and 
cultures. The document contains 
relatively few rules, preferring that 
rules be local, variable, and accom- 
modated to times, places, and 
especially persons. Ignatius readi- 
ly, but with honest respect, discards 
or rewrites the traditions that bind 
religious life to the monastic model 



of Christian spirituality. 

It is this graced flexibility of the 
Jesuit way of life that makes it 
plausible that the ideals of the 
founder of the Order have been 
kept richly alive over the years. 
What is this ideal? 

The conversion of Ignatius of J 
Loyola was essentially his personal 
discovery of the greatest, most at- 
tractive of all leaders, Jesus Christ. 
He gladly gave up all service to an 
earthly king in order to bind himself 
and his followers passionately, ir- 
revocably to the services of this: 
King of Kings and Lord of Lords. 
And, so was born the ideal of Jesuit 
apostolic service. At first, this ideal 
was conceived to be a life spent in 
the Holy Land serving Jesus where 




ABOVE: Rev. Robert Rimes, S.J. relaxes in the 

Peace Garden. 



^4 



- % v 



32 




Jesus Himself had lived, labored, 
suffered in service of us. But Ig- 
natius was open to growth and to a 
new invasion of God's graces. An 
inner vision took place in late 1537 
just outside Rome at a roadside 
chapel in La Storta. This experience 
fixed him irrevocably in a second 
understanding of the ideal which 
replaced and fulfilled the first. The 
ideal henceforth would be this: to be 
with the Risen Christ, serving the 
church on earth and her visible 
head, the reigning Pope. This ideal 
was first to take him to Rome then 
through his faithful companions, to 
any place on earth where there 
was promise of God's greater glory. 
The ideal became crystalized in the 
Jesuit motto AMDA "ad majorem 
Dei gloriam"; (service) "to the 
greater glory of God." 

It is likely that Ignatius' ideal was 
influenced more by his own inner 
vision of God and Jesus Christ than 
by any other force. Still, were he to 
have searched the scriptures for an 
expression of that ideal, surely he 
would have paused at these 
gospel-recorded sayings of Jesus 
the Christ: "The Son of man also 
came not to be served but to serve, 
and to give his life as a ransom for 
many." (Mk. 10:45). "A new com- 
mandment I give to you, that you 
love one another; even as I have 
loved you, that you also love one 
another. By this all men will know 
that you are my disciples, if you 
have love for one another." (Jo. 
13:34-35). 

"If anyone serves me, he must 
follow me; and where I am, there 
shall my servant be also; if any one 
serves me, the Father will honor 
him." (Jo. 12-26). 

Nothing would please Ignatius 
Loyola more than the knowledge 
that the Society of Jesus was serving 
her students in higher education in 
1987 by inspiring and supporting 
them in all the transitions of their 
young lives "to the greater glory of 
God." 



By Rev. Robert Rimes, SJ. 



s.j. 



FAR LEFT: Rev. Christopher Viscardi, 
leads a class in Theology. 
LEFT: Rev. Paul S. Tipton, S.J. and Rev. Vin 
cent Malatesta at Opening Convocation. 



33 




ABOVE: Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Dr. John D. MacNamara and Academic 

Dean, Dr. Alex Landi. 
RIGHT: John Oester, Vice-President for Finance. 



34 




TOP LEFT: Dr. Benjamin Shearer, Dean of Student Services. 

ABOVE: (L-R) Dr. James E. Martin, Jr., Dean of Students, and Robert P. Johnson, Vice-President for 
Development. 



35 



FACULTY 
PROFILE: 

Dr. Ken 
Hamilton 

To anybody majoring in business 
or any of its related fields the name 
Dr. Hamilton means many things. 
To some, he is known as the head of 
the Business Department, to others, 
he is the professor they fear most 
and or try to put off as long as possi- 
ble. To the rest of us, he is one of the 
most respected of all professors at 
Spring Hill College. 

To those of you who do not know 
Dr. Kenneth Hamilton, you may be 
able to catch a glimpse of him in the 
stands at a Badger Basketball 
game. His love of sports comes from 
his college days at West Liberty 
State where he was the football 
quarterback for four years and 
baseball team member for three 
years. Continuing his love of sports, 
Dr. Hamilton coached football for 
two years while also teaching at his 
Alma Mater. Today, he is the facul- 
ty athletic supervisor at Spring Hill. 
This entails working with the 
Athletic Department to ensure that 
academic standards are upheld by 
campus athletes. 

Dr. Hamilton has been teaching 
for a total of 17 years. After 
teaching at West Liberty State, he 
began teaching for Whelling Col- 
lege, a Jesuit institution in West 
Virginia. He then came to Spring 
Hill in 1983 as head of the Business 
Department and has since orga- 
nized and implemented the Col- 
lege's first Masters of Business pro- 
gram. The program began in the 
Fall of 1986. 

By Maggie Cunneen 




The Inside 



36 




OUT 



Story 



TOP LEFT: Dr. Ken Hamilton helps Christine Ginn with a class 

problem. 

LOWER LEFT: Business Dept. — Front Row: Dr. Kenneth 

Hamilton, Dr. Donald Wilson, Mrs. Beth Dubose, Dr. Ralph 

Sandler. Row 2: Andrew Sharpe, Dr. Tom Wood. 

LEFT: Student Activities — Cynthia Young, Archie Anderson. 

BELOW: Athletics — L-R: Pam Young, Jim Miller, Carl Nash, 

Cynthia Moore, Dr. Drayton Miller, Frank Sims. 




37 



FACULTY 
PROFILE: 

Barry Corona 

Mr. Barry Corona is a man who 
sports many more hats than the walk- 
ing cap he will be sure to wear as he 
hurries about campus on a blustery 
day. Every day he wears his 
"Chemistry Professor" hat with an 
entertaining tilt as he shares his 
knowledge of science and its history 
with his students. 

He wears the hat of the "innovator" 
as he travels to national conferences 
to learn about the best way to develop 
an undergraduate research program 
at Spring Hill College. 

And in the Spring of 1987 he was 
given a new hat to wear. He is now the 
owner of the "Teacher of the Year, 
1987" hat, given to him by students 
who realize that only a person with a 
special style can sport so many hats at 
once. 

By Caffa Montgomery 

TOP RIGHT: Mr. Barry Corona shows off one of 
his many hats. 

RIGHT: Dr. Shari Katz and Dr. Mel Brandon. 
Turberville, Mark Thomson, Carol Ann McAleer. 
Row 2: Angela Strickland, Florence Holm, Robin 
Hollinger, Lovie Ganey, Terrie Moore. 












The Inside 



38 




OUT 



BELOW: Business Office — Front Row: Laurie Turberville, Mark 
Thomson, Carol Ann McAleer. Row 2: Angela Strickland, 
Florence Holm, Robin Hollinger, Lovie Ganey, Terrie Moore. 




ft ftfi 




Zr Nbl MpjTc 

\N Re 




Ru Rh Pd A9 Cd In [Sn Sb 1e 

Os h pFlAulHg Tlipb Bi Po At 



fn 



Pr NdPmSm 

, ! . I ., ] 

Pa u In 



Ho; Er 
Es Fm 








K 






39 



FACULTY 
PROFILE: 

Rev. James Lambert, S.J. 



Students who have had class with 
Father Lambert will agree that his 
use of class time redefines the word 
"efficiency." Whether the subject is 
organic chemistry, instrumental 
analysis, aviation, or some other 
subject about which he seems to 
have unlimited information, not a 
moment of class is spared. Any stu- 
dent will also agree that teachers 
with his depth of concern for 
students and with his gentle 
temperament are rare. He is a fine 
example of Christian life for the 
students of Spring Hill College. 

Fr. Lambert joined the Jesuits im- 
mediately after high school, and 
then attended Spring Hill College 
where his majors were chemistry 
and philosophy. After obtaining his 
Doctorate of Philosophy in 
Chemistry from Johns Hopkins 
University, he completed four years 
of theological studies. Fr. Lambert 
joined the SHC faculty in the fall of 



1968. He served as Academic Dean 
for two years following 1977. For the 
past five years, he has served as 
chairman of the Chemistry 
Department. 

A unique and useful hobby of his 
is aviation. Fr. Lambert obtained a 
pilot's license during the summer of 
1978, and he currently flies for 
faculty and staff travel to destina- 
tions such as Memphis, Miami, and 
Atlanta. 

Having been a part of the Spring 
Hill community for nineteen years, 
he has witnessed changes over the 
years in the school, and in the stu- 
dent body. Of the direction Spring 
Hill College has taken, Fr. Lambert 
has said that the academic pro- 
gram has improved, and the stu- 
dent body is generally a more 
prepared group for the challenges 
that Spring Hill has to offer. 

By Angie Levert 





The Inside 



40 




OUT 




i. — - i. 

ABOVE: Kathy Eiland, and Wanda Hall. 





ABOVE: Student Development — Front Row: Shirley Kargleder, 
Mary Beth Magno. Row 2: Ola Anise, Josetta Mullory, Chuck 
Mason, Charlie Smoke. Row 3: Elbert LaLande, Frances 
Emerson, Anne Herbert. 

RIGHT: Theology — L-R: Rev. Christopher Viscardi, S.J., Sister 
Maribeth Howell, O.P., Dr. George Gilmore, Rev. Frederick 
Gunti, S.J., Rev. David Borbridge, S.J., Dr. Emmanuel Cutrone, 
Rev. Vincent Malatesta, S.J., Rev. Robert Rimes, S.J. 




41 



FACULTY 
PROFILE: 

Brian Connolly on Freshman 

Composition 

Freshman composition is just one of those hurdles 
you have to go over before you get to real English 
courses; at least, that's what you're supposed to 
think. I'm sure, though, that if you look at what ac- 
tually happens with the class, and at all the 
marvelous benefits that come from it, you'll come 
around to our point of view. 

First, consider the sleepless nights. Sure the pro- 
fessor gave you a week's warning and ample op- 
portunity to get help, but it would hardly be fair (let 
alone cool) to take advantage of that. Better to wait 
for the last day, the last hour, before taking the 
plunge. At 2:30 a.m., you're probably thinking 
unkind thoughts about your poor professor. The 
keys on the typewriter are all turning fuzzy as you 
hunt and peck your way through the literary 
minefield, but not to worry. With the dawn comes 
rejoicing, because that's how long it'll take to finish. 

Second, think about all the writing you get to do, 
in some cases, up to eight papers a semester! It's 
not every day you get a chance to do that kind of 
work, and pay "Good Money" for privilege. You 
write, then rewrite, and write again; some papers 
are stubborn and will refuse to come to heel until 
the third rewrite. Of course, there's the odd student 
who'll hand in a pretty shaggy piece of work, but 
we all know that papers of quality are few and far 
between. 

If you abandon yourself to the expertese and 
compassion of the professor, all will come right. 
With unstinting devotion and hard work, the in- 
structor will bring you to the light of literacy and 
make that investment of energy and worry pay off. 
Freshman comp. may be a hurdle, but it should also 
make the rest of the course that much easier to run. 

By Brian T. Connolly 






The Inside 



42 






OUT 




LOWER LEFT: Teacher Education - Front Row: Elaine 
Blount, Teresa Cassity, Arlon Beckland, Dr. Betsy Staf- 
ford. Row 2: Br. Clestane, Br. Felviane, Dr. Robert 
Schlagal. 

ABOVE: Student Records: L-R: Norma Dixon, Kathleen 
McBride, Mary Rose Tacon. 

FAR LEFT: English Dept. - Front Row: Dr. Marie Kessel, 
Dr. David Sauer. Row 2: Dr. Charles Boyle, Dr. Barbara 
Nolan, Dr. John Hafner, Rev. Michael Williams, S. J., Rev. 
Joseph Vanderholt, S. J. 




43 



FACULTY 
PROFILE: 

Dr. Kathleen Orange 

Dr. Kathleen Orange, Associate Professor of 
Political Science and Chairperson of the Political 
Science Department, is much more than classroom 
instructor. She is actively involved within the Spring 
Hill College community. Her involvement con- 
tributes greatly to the intellectual, spiritual, and 
social growth of students. 

Some of her academically-related activities in- 
clude serving on the Academic Standards commit- 
tee, serving on the Core Curriculum committee, and 
participating in the S.H.C. Eschange Program in 
Guatemala City. 

Her activities beyond academics include her in- 
volvement with the Faith Sharing group and her 
position as moderator of the Ladies Auxiliary. 

In recognition for her contribution to the SHC 
community, she was honored as Teacher of the 
Year in 1983. In the same year, the Student 
Government Association presented her with the 
Fagot Award for her contributions outside the 
classroom. 

Besides her numerous activities on our campus, 
Dr. Orange is active in her own parish as a choir 
member, and the Mobile Hispanic community. She 
helps many refugees with the legal problems they 
have upon entering the United States. 

Believe it or not, Dr. Orange does have a little 
free time. She enjoys reading, sewing, visiting 
friends, and learning Greek, (she is fluent in 
Spanish.) 

When asked what she regards as important, Dr. 
Orange said that reaching out is what life is all 
about. She feels that people in American society 
need to come back together in dealing with the 
fragmentation, alienation, and loneliness that 
prevails in our society. 

By Susanne Simmons 

TOP: Dr. Kathleen Orange talks with Brian Dennis about a class 

project. 





ABOVE: Residence Life — Front Row: Tom Hughes, Bob Pfeffle. Row 2: 

Rob Dukes, Scott Striplin, Wilda James, Paula Tiernan, Jennifer 

Howard, John Wolfarth. Row 3: Cyndi Young, Caffa Montgomery, 

Brian Connolly, Jeanne Kleinschmidt. Row 4: Jaime Betbeze, Paul 

Herring, Stella Livingston, Ed Van Bloem, Tim Clarke, Perry Hockaday. 



The Inside 



44 




\ 



OUT 




ABOVE: Finance Office — L-R: Patti Davis, John Oester, 

Carolyn Sanderson. 

LEFT: Computer Center — L-R: Glenn Bell, Dr. Jerry Scott. 





45 




46 



ORGANIZATION S 

Is the President's Room busy at 6 p.m.? 



On Archie Anderson's desk, in the lower 
right hand corner, were three notebooks. Each 
page was a daily listing the meeting rooms 
available to campus organizations. Each 
page was filled with entries. 

The reason? With limited space available 
for student functions, "reservations" for 
meeting rooms had to be made through the 
Student Activities Office. And with more clubs 
having more meetings, space was at a 
premium. 

Right around dinner hours seemed to be the 
most popular time, so the trip to the Campus 
Center only had to be made once. However, if 
a group waited until 9:30 or 10:00 p.m., the 
chances of "Getting a Table" were much bet- 
ter. Sundays were the most popular, while 
"Wednesday's at 7:00, quarters were being 
used" elsewhere. 

The club-sponsored social agenda may 
have lightened up during year, but the round 
of meetings was rising. 



JPW 

LEFT: The Student Government Association celebrated 
the end of the year with a crawfish boil. George Zoghby, 
Jim Brady, Marianne Carrie, and Tim McNair break open 
the fish. 



47 



^ 

& 



TORCH 1987 



For Alcohol and your 
Body, They've got 

ADVICE 

In a year when alcohol con- 
sciousness had been raised, 
BACCHUS, (Boost Alcohol 
Awareness Concerning the 
Health of University Students), at- 
tempted to promote responsible 
alcohol use. 

BACCHUS provided students 
with a T.G.I.F. Party featuring 
music, mocktails, popcorn, and 
cookies. In October, the group 
joined with the Student Govern- 
ment Association to promote Na- 
tional Alcohol Awareness Week. 
Activities included were, an ap- 
pearance by Sargent Pitts, an 
Alabama State Trooper, the 
distribution of alternative 
beverage coupons from 
"Thirsties," as well as posters. 

During the Spring semester, 
BACCHUS distributed informa- 
tion during the Health and 
Wellness Fair. During the Mardi 
Gras season, the organization 
handed out balloons at Campus 
Mardi Gras. Students were also 
asked to sign pledge cards which 
promised that the student would 
not drink and drive over Mardi 
Gras Break. 

By Felecia Jernigan 



RIGHT: Front Row: 
Cecila Ackels, Ross 
Phelps, Felecia Jer- 
nigan. Row 2: Susan 
DeWolfe, Ted Lander. 





ABOVE: Health Advisory Committee — L-R: Susanne Simmons, Mary York, Tim Clarke, 

Jeanne Kleinschmidt, Mary Beth Magno. 



48 



FOR MEMBERS ONLY 



BACCHUS/HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



'M 






ABOVE: In an Alcohol Consumption test, 
Elizabeth Gander, George Zoghby, 
Laurie Gulley, and Brian Jones display 
amount of beer consumed. 
LEFT: Laurie Gulley demonstrates her 
coordination after drinking eight beers. 



Photos By Chevy Pitty 






I 







49 



& 



TORCH 1987 



OV 



& 



Derby Days 
went over with a 

SPLASH 

It was a warm and sunny day 
in April. All seemed normal on 
the Hill, except for one thing, 
students wearing black derbies. 
What could this signify? Why, 
the beginning of Sigma Chi Der- 
by Days, of course. The second 
annual fund raiser sponsored 
by the Sigma Chi's began with 
a competition to see which 
sorority could collect the most 
Derby hats off the heads of 
Sigma Chi's. During the Kick- 
Off party at Tropic's, all the hats 
were counted and the Phi Phi 
Mu sorority won. 

The next event was the Derby 
Hunt. In teams of five, cars of 
sorority women followed clues, 
throughout the city of Mobile. 
The Phi Mu's were also 
declared the winner of this 
event. The Skit Competition, or 
"Sig TV" was hosted by the 
Sigma Chi's on Thursday night. 
An added twist was a costume 
competition. Each team was 
given a strip of material to 
design a costume. The Gamma 
Gamma Gamma sorority won 
the costume competition, while 
the Delta Delta Delta's took 
home first place for the best skit. 



A Mud Volleyball Tournament 
and Greek Games ended the 
week-long event. 

After all the points were tallied, 
the Phi Mu sorority was declared 
the winner. 

children in Mobile. Together, the 
Sigma Chi fraternity and the 
sororities, raised almost $4,000 for 
the home. 






By Marie Carrington 

RIGHT: Sheila Ryan and Monica Cano 
compete in the Mud Volleyball Tournament 
against the Delta Delta Delta sorority. 
BELOW: Deanne Neyrey and Kim Miran- 
da, of Gamma Gamma Gamma sorority 
get the ball back over the net while sinking 
in the mud. 




w 








50 




MEMBERS ONLY 



DERBY/BETA/TRI-DELTA 



BELOW: Sigma Beta Phi — Front Row: 
Laura Fazio, Lawrence Short, Monica 
Cano, Jennifer Lowe, Heidi Moore, Alisa 
Hettenhausen, Gina Timphony. 





ABOVE: Delta Delta Delta — Front Row: Stacy Orgeron, Tiffany Acosta, Nicole St. Romain, 
Rosemary Majou, Germaine Belleaud, Colleen Madden, Shawna Diggins, Kelly Lynch, 
Christina Thiele, Kelly Collins, Suzanne Doerer. Row 2: Michelle Ryan, Angie Levert, 
Marianne Currie, Laura Raineri, Jane Ford, Jennifer Farmer, Rachel Broadhead, Cara 
Parillo, Bridget Junen, Elizabeth DeSmet, Tricia Rahuba, Kirsten Meyer, Denise Oravitz, 
Marie Carrington, Kathy Raineri, Cynthia Blaha, Denise Cieutat. 



51 



MEMBERS ONLY 



SHAPe/CHEMISTRY CLUB 




ABOVE: Paula Tieman and Scott Striplin 
disturb Alison Salloum's peace at 
mealtime. 

Sandra Pence shares in the fun. 
RIGHT: SHAPe — Front Row: John 
Wolfarth. Row 2: Kathy Williams, Karen 
Roth, Paula Tieman, John Bishop. Row 3: 
Vicki Guarisco, Natallie Keiser, Mary E. 
Cole, Stacie Sierra, Lisa Wallis. Row 4: 
Angie Scott, Betsy King, Mollie Letch- 
worth, Ann Smith, Tracey Gerchow. Row 
5: Alison Salloum, Tom Hughes, Mary 
Ann Carlisle, Jorge Cos, Gina Timphony, 
Monica Cano, Jennifer Lowe, Amanda 
Letchworth. Row 6: Sandra Pence, Angie 
Shatas, Chris Maier, Molly Keenan, Alma 
Robichaux, Kevin Cottrell. Row 7: Marie 
Godlewski, Dorinda Williams, Kim 
Williams, James Hutchins, Bemadette 
Roberts, Robert Harrison, Tany McCar- 
thy, Jim Adams, Patricia Pon, Alan 
Young, Jackie Ford, Mark Hunt, John 
Schslinger. On Rail: Marilyn Bell, Sam 
Nieman. 




52 



TORCH 1987 

In pursuit 
of two very 
different 



Ji 



REACTIONS 




Imagine being away from all 
deadlines, schedules, papers, 
tests and pressures of school and 
day to day life. 

Imagine being with a group of 
30-40 people whom you see 
every day, but never really get a 
chance to meet, talk with, or get 
to know. 

Imagine a beautiful, relaxing 
place, nestled in the country, with 
no cars or noise around. 

Sound tempting? Well, you 
have just experienced the begin- 
nings of Awakening or SHAPe, 
(Spring Hill Awakening Pro- 
gram.) SHAPe is a retreat group 
on campus that was founded in 
the fall of 1985. It is open to the 
whole student body. Two retreats 



°'N 






are held each year and both are 
staffed totally by students. It is a 
retreat consisting of a series of 
talks, and activities presented by 
the students and a lot of discuss- 
ing and quiet time, and a lot of 
fun. It is a program put on totally 
by students for other students. 

Imagine a chance to learn 
more about yourself and your 
relationship with God and hav- 
ing a great time in the process. 
Just imagine . . . and then 
AWAKEN. 

By Karen Roth 

LEFT: Paula Tieman provides entertain- 
ment for SHAPe. 

BELOW: Chemistry Club: Angie Shatas, 
Rev. James Lambert, S.J., Miles Maxwell, 
Hunter Nelson, Amanda Letchworth, 
Wilda James, Angie Levert. 




53 






TORCH 1987 



\# 



New constitutions 
bring changes to 

GREEKS 

The Inter-Sorority Council has 
been a very unique organization. 
As a member of ISC for the past 
four years, I have witnessed 
many of the different changes the 
organization has gone through. 
Some of these transitions have 
not been easy to accept, for no 
one likes changes. 

Here, at Spring Hill College, 
tradition has always been an 
enormous part of our heritage. 

When ISC was started at 
Spring Hill, there were only local 
sororities. There are now two 
local groups and two national 
groups. 

We are a closely-knit group 
which helps when we have to 
work out solutions to sometimes 
difficult situations. 

This year, was the second year 
for ISC to host dry rush. The 
sororities were more prepared 
which made rush run smoother. 

The last major transition ISC 
had to go through was the transi- 
tion from a local council to a na- 
tional Panhellenic-affliated coun- 
cil. This change was an on-going 
process that sounds easier than it 
was. 

By Angela Torres 




ABOVE: Kristen Habert and Megan Martin prepare for a formal rush 
party. 



54 



MEMBERS ONLY 



ISC/FC 




LEFT: Inter-Fraternity Council — 
Front Row: Tom Dulske, Mark 
Laudaudio, Danny Wolter, Jaime 
Betbeze. Row 2: Archie Anderson, Bob 
Pfeffle, Ted Lander, Paul Cussen, 
Sean Barry. 





ABOVE: In a beer bowl game, Danny 
Wolter attempts to avoid a tackle by 
Carlos Miramontes. 
LEFT: Inter-Sorority Council — Front 
Row: Jackie Klock, Maggie Cunneen, 
Babette Charbonnet, Mollie Letch- 
worth, Suzanne Doerer. Row 2: Cyndi 
Young, Grace Kelly, Angela Torres, 
Debbie Figueroa. 



55 



KNIGHTS/LADIES AUXILIARY 



MEMBERS ONLY 



RIGHT: Dr. David Sauer was charged of 
"contributing to the confusion of Spring Hill 
students." He was cleared of all charges, 
however. 





f? '^mm*. 



ABOVE: Knights of Columbus — Front 
Row: Rev. Michael Williams, S.J., Arthur 
Estopian, Scott Gomez, Michael 
Knobloch, Pete Smith. Row 2: Pierre Nino, 
Lionel Jacob, Mark Hunt. 
RIGHT: Ladies Auxiliary — Front Row: 
Stephanie Treutel, Kathy Sisterman, 
Tammy Pulliam, Angie Shatas, Vicki 
Guarisco, Shannon Storm, Darla Nelson, 
Lisa Wallis, Karen Waddick. Row 2: 
Tracey Gerchow, Ann Smith, Pat Pon, 
Stacie Sierra, Manami Naka, Bessie Ham, 
Tammi Cramer, Rosemary Liberti. Row 3: 
Kelen Vorbach, Charlie McGraw, Anne 
Marie Gamble, Danny Acousta, Richard 
Godlewski, Erin Hoyt, John Bishop, Benjie 
Belen, Jim Adams. 




RIGHT: Baseball player, Glen Estopinal was 
found guilty of stealing second base in the 
"You're the Jury" at Mardi Gras. 



56 



TORCH 1987 



Ji 








°'N 



eft* 



Organizations sponsor S.A.D. 
to help the 

HUNGRY 

Every March, The Ladies Auxiliary and the Knights 
of Columbus storm the battlements of the Spring Hill 
College community and beyond to raise money for 
starving people both locally and abroad. The project, 
known as Starvation Awareness, is an annual 
tradition which brought in over $1,200 in 1987. 

Not only did the funds raised increase from previous 
years, but a number of new fundraising programs 
were experimented with and implemented. New 
programs such as Spring Cleaning, Big Man on 
Campus, You're the Jury, and an off-campus Egg Sale 
supplemented traditional favorites such as Penny 
Power, the Parent/Student Fun Run, and the S.A.D. 
Meal Giveaway. 

The new projects, "You're the Jury" made some 
teachers and students criminals for a day in the name 
of charity. The Egg Sale, an off-campus project, was 
door-to-door solicitation with a twist of humor. One 
household is asked to donate an egg to charity while 
another is asked to buy it. Finally, the "Big Man on 
Campus" contest was judged by the campus through 
donations. Rev. Roy Vollenwelder, S.J. or "Chief" was 
elected as the most popular campus figure. 

Starvation Awareness raised approximately $1,200. 
Half of the money was given to needy in Mobile and 
the remaining amount was donated to missionaries in 
Guatemala and Kenya. 

By Tammi Cramer 



57 



>°1 



Delta Phi Delta goes 

PHIMU 



The Delta Phi Delta sorority 
founded in 1967. at Spring Hill 
College, colonized with the na- 
tional Phi Mu fraternity in 1987. 
Phi Mu is one of 26 women's 
fraternities which make up the 
National Panhellenic 
Conference. 

Last Spring, Delta Phi Delta 
began looking into national 
sororities and met with several 
groups interested in establishing 
a chapter at Spring Hill College. 
Members finally voted to affiliate 
with the Phi Mu fraternity. On 
January 18, 1987, 21 members 
became initiated into the 
sisterhood of Phi Mu. 

Phi Mu offers social, academic, 
and spiritual challenges 
anothers realm of college life. It 
also offers student members a 
generous scholarship and loan 
program. It aids the less for- 
tunate through the philanthropy 
Project HOPE (Health Opportuni- 
ty for People Everywhere) was 
adopted as a national philan- 
thropic project in 1963. 

Although Delta Phi Delta has 
changed its name, the members 
and many of their traditions have 
remained the same. Their former 
colors of blue and green have 
been changed to pink and white. 
Members continue on campus 
tradition, to be active in campus 
life. 

By Mollie Letchworth 




TOP: Mobile Club — L-R: Mary Munn, Scott Striplin, William Lagman, Laurie Oester, Beth 

Greenwood. 

ABOVE: Members of the National Office of the Phi Mu fraternity present the new charter of 

president Maggie Cunneen. 



58 



MEMBERS ONLY 



MOBILE CLUB/PHI MU/TRI-GAMMA 



BELOW: Gamma Gamma Gamma — Front Row: Karen Murray, Barbara Savage, Leslie Abadie, Hollie Hannon, Amy Midkiff, Noelle Hubler, 
Jackie Martin, Alexis Baker, Jennifer Buck. Row 2: Phoebe Miller, Kim Miranda, Shannon Hunt, Maureen Keating, Brenna Denton, Cathy 
Ryan, Sharon Clary, Frances Little, Lisa Parozzi, Angie Scott, Tammy Ardoin. Row 3: Lizzi Neuman, Jennifer Miniquitti, Stella Livingston, 
Hilliary Richardson, Babette Charbonnet, Marie Scavullo, Diana Rayfield, Jane Lambert, Mary Catherine Winter, Erin Mitchell, Maureen 
O'Donnell, Susan Elcan, Sarah Kilbane, Bridget Boyle, Elaine Cacciatore, Ashley Gomillion, Monica Thelen, Erin Brennan. 




ABOVE: Phi Mu — Front Row: Michele Zoghby, Maggie Cunneen, Sharon Falconer, Laura LoBuglio, Denise Clark, Kristen Fabing, Catherine 
Foote. Row 2: Francine Alleman, Lena Astilla, Debbie Hertler, DeeDee West, Renee Halphen, Claudia Kennedy, Betsy King, Alison Salloum, 
Kerry Early, Aimee Maier, Megan Martin. Row 3: Jill Janick, Molly Maclnnes, Madeline Elzen, Kristi Roper, Lisa Murphy, Shay Sharpe, Kristen 
Habert, Wilda James, Frances Sanders, Lisa Cade, Karen Haynes, Tamara Daffin, Anne Mennes, Mary McGraw. Row 4: Paige Danos, Mollie 
Letchworth, Debbie Sema, Mary Fleming, Betsy Brown, Cindy Wunsch, Amy Bonness, Stefanie Cunningham, Molly Strain, Stephanie 
Graham, Amanda Letchworth, Pam Little, Mary Kay Lange, Mimi Iacabucci, Julie Moll, Anne Pigott, Debbie Figueroa, Susan Watts. 



59 



tf> 



^ 



TORCH 1987 






PRCA 's Fashion 

Show Brought 

students and Style 

CHIC 
TO CHIC 

The audience began lining up 
an hour before the production. 
Peering through the glass, they 
tried to steal a glimpse of the final 
touches being made to decora- 
tions and props. 

Inside, the excitement was 
multiplied ten times over. The 
runway and tables downstairs 
glittered under the lights, while 
upstairs, the scene had become a 
high fashion frenzy. In between 
checking the line-up and review- 
ing the script, the models went 
through a transformation. 
Average students became mov- 
ing mannequins. When all was 
ready, Dante Amodeo pushed 
the button marked "Play," and 
the Fourth Annual PRCA Fashion 
Show began. 

Created around the theme "In- 
dulge," the show was a Parent's 
Weekend favorite ritual. While 
students used the runway to 
display up to the minute fashions, 
their parents and friends sipped 
champagne, nibbled on 
strawberries and hand-dipped 
chocolate, and simply soaked up 
the glamour. 

For nearly two hours, the 
models walked and turned, 
caught forever on tape by the 
television production class. The 
afternoon of fresh flowers and 
gold came to a close as Phoebe 
Miller and John Wolfarth met on 
the runway as bride and groom, 
complete with Madeline Elzen as 
a Maid of Honor. Remarked 
Phoebe later, "I only wish my 
real wedding can be that 
glamourous." 




60 





PRCA 

LEFT: The traditional 
ending of any fashion 
show is a review of 
the latest bridal 
apparel. Phoebe 
Miller, John Wolfarth, 
and Madeline Elzen 
play the roles of the 
bridal party. 




LEFT: Modeling spring clothing, Debbie 
Figueroa, Tom Lowenstein, and Michelle 
Prevost pause for the audience. 
FAR LEFT: Annette McGill gives the 
audience a back view of her spring dress. 



61 



*& 



TORCH 1987 



ov 



& 



When the morale 
was low, they 
were raising 

SPIRIT 

With the previously raised 
drinking age, more students than 
ever before were eliminated from 
legal drinking age and campus 
parties seemed to dry up. In an 
attempt to fill the void, the Stu- 
dent Government Entertainment 
Committee planned events such 
as Oktoberfest and Mardi Gras. 

The Committee also provided 
students with comedians, bands 
and solo performers. Spencer 
Gillen, Committee Chairperson, 
felt the committee tried to provide 
students with entertainment 
which they would be interested 
in. "We tried to implement 
changes from the previous year 
when we had a lot of dance 
bands. The feedback we got from 
students was to have more 
college-oriented bands, playing 
more progressive music, rather 
than top 40," Gillen said. 

In addition to musical acts, the 
committee provided several com- 
edians, such as Andy Andrews, 
the Mary Wong Comedy Team, 
and David Naster. Gillen felt 
there were difficulties in pro- 
moting the acts as well as finding 
an adequate facility for the per- 
formances. "We need an area 
with elevated seating," Gillen 
said. "If we could have the Mur- 
ray Hall Auditorium fixed up that 
would work for those types of 
programs as well as films," he 
added. 




62 



MEMBERS ONLY 



SGA/CHEERLEADERS/ SHORES 



TOP LEFT: Painter Denny Dent 
entertained guests of Parents' Weekend 
by painting celebrity portraits to music. 
LOWER LEFT: The Famous Vacationers 
provide fun tunes like "Elevator Love," for 
students in a Thank God its Thursday 
concert. 




LEFT: SHORES — Front Row: John 
Fritchie, Damian Vitalie, Michael Olinde. 
Row 2: John Millizano, Denise O'Hallaron, 
Chris Moynihan, Andrew Miniquitti, John 
McMahon, Rev. Gerald Regan, S.J. 

LEFT: Cheerleaders — Front Row: Cindy 
Marshal], Alisa Hettenhausen, Mena 
Ford, Denise Clarke, Lisa Murphy, Mar- 
cus Johnson. Row 2: Sam Bauer, Ed Har- 
din, Scott Eastin, Steven Perrault, Barry 
Sevin. 



63 



*>!*. 
$» 



7??e Fraternities 
keep campus life 

SOCIAL 

Some of the most traditional 
events made the campus social 
life active. The Sigma Chi's 
hosted the Boxer Short party and 
the Phi Kappa Tau's re-created 
the Hurricane Party at Thirsty's. 
The Kappas made the IFC room 
shake with the 60's psychedelic 
party. 

The second year of dry rush 
kept the groups busy coming up 
with new ideas to get prospective 
pledges interested. New themes 
had to be applied to old situa- 
tions, but all in all progress was 
made. 

RIGHT: Soaking down the mud, Patrick 
Malouf prepares the Mud Volleyball 
Court. 

LOWER RIGHT: Kappas — Front Row: 
Richard Hart, Billy Polcha, Marc Rodri- 
quez, Andy Renard, Jimmy Lamaroux, 
Brian Carroll. Row 2: Paul Supik, Danny 
Wolter, Jim McNamara, Brad Shepard, 
Dennis Blaikie, C. H. Crane, Mark 
Laudadio. 










eH iUv® ■dl 1 : 



ftp** 



v 



** '■■« 4C~ ■ 




64 



MEMBERS ONLY 



FRATERNITIES 



LEFT: Phi Kappa Tau — Front Row: Greg Snipes, John Lontz, Sean Lynch, Joe Lange, John 
McMahon, Raleigh Cox, J. J. Foster, Tom Lowenstein. Row 2: T. J. Lejuene, Win Stuardi, Don 
Young, Tim McNair, Chris Sullivan, Chris Heinze, John McCarrick. Row 3: George Falcon, An- 
drew Minigutti, David France, Jay Olinde, Pat McNulty, Amardo Pitters, Mike Brennan, Brian 
Snediker. Row 4: Bret Hanneman, John Corr, Jamie Cazyou, Darryl Smith, Packy Bowling, 
Mike Kintz, Bob Pfeffle, Tom Watson, Mike Leary, John Zollinger, Scott Binder, Chris 
Cheevers, Mike Madaras, Sean Ducleaus, Tom Hughes, Chris Arcement, Rob Dukes. 





LEFT: Omicron Sigma — Front Row: Mike Latousek, Susan Elcan, Lee Diplacido, Liz Brocato, 
Monica Davidson, Frances Little, Jim Farrell. Row 2: Larry Druhan, Ron Teasdale, John 
Brophy, Paul Fillinger, John Scanlon, Walter Little, John Carroll, Tom McMichael, Tom Dulske. 
Row 3: Phil Callobre. 



65 



*& 



TORCH 1987 



ov 



\P 



Troubadours travel 
to perform 

PASSION 
PLAY 

The original Troubadours were 
groups of traveling performers 
who sang for their supper during 
the Middle Ages. Though they 
are long gone, their tradition 
lives on at Spring Hill College. 
Every year, the Spring Hill 
Troubadours travel from church 
to church performing the Passion 
Play during the Lenten season. 
And, like the Troubadours of old, 
they are thanked with donations 
of food and money. 

The Troubadours were started 
in 1978, by Mary Ellen Morris, a 
student who had been involved 
in performing the Passion Play at 
her high school. Noticing that 
Spring Hill had no such program, 
she began one of her own. The 
original play was quite different 
from the one currently per- 
formed. There was no music, and 
the narration was done by an 
angel, complete with coat hanger 
halo and parchment. Slowly it 
evolved in the version performed 
today. 

In its ninth year, Troubadours 
did eight performances, in- 
cluding one in Louisiana during 
Spring Break. 

In many ways, 1987 was a 
year of firsts. Many freshmen 
joined the cast, including Charlie 




McGraw, who played the role of 
Jesus. Veteran performer, Danny 
t Borst, attempted to direct for the 
first time. 

The most important thing about 
the Troubadours, however is not 
the cast, which changes from 
year to year, but the unity and 
closeness of the group and the 
emotions they evoke from au- 
diences when they perform. 
Director, Danny Borst said the 
beauty of Troubadours, is that it 
brings people together. 



Mike Knobloch, who played 
Joseph of Armithea and the cen- 
turion, said, "The program gets to 
the root of each member of the 
audience's heart and soul." 

Troubadours is an emotional 
experience, but more than that, it 
is a sharing of joy and sorrow 
that affects everyone involved, 
cast and audience. 

By Tammi Cramer 

ABOVE: Charile McGraw, in the role of 
Jesus, bears the cross. 



66 



MEMBERS ONLY 



TROUBADOURS/CHORALE/PEP BAND 



BELOW: Pep Band — L-R: Stephanie 
Kuechmann, Mike Jarreau, Pete Smith, 
Rocko Landi, Craig Viscardi. 




LEFT: Chorale — Front Row: Tracey 
Gerchow, Suzanne Leopole, Ann Tran, 
Ramona Heil, Theresa Kircher. Row 2: 
Ross Phelps, Dan Borst, Ira Swingle, 
Richard Godlweski, Hunter Nelson. 



67 



INTRAMURALS 



MEMBERS ONLY 




■ -'■'/ ( .. ■ ■ ■■ W.: 



ABOVE: Brian Sned- 
iker reaches back to 
throw, but is put out of 
action when his flag is 
taken. 

RIGHT: Mike Knob- 
lock chases down a 
running back in an In- 
tramural football 
game. 












}j I 




V 




"*%. 



68 



TORCH 1987 







Intramural Results 

Pool Tournament — Scott Binder 

Men's Volleyball — Team I 
Kevin Dize, John Breen, Mike 
Leary, Chris Gibbonds, Scott 
Striplin, Earl Crupps, Bill Roohi. 

Dart Tournament — Chipper 
Gillen 

Womens' Volleyball — Gamma 
Gamma Gamma 

Womens' Basketball — Phi Mu 

Football — Brews 
Todd Thayer, Sean Ducleaux, 
Mike Kintz, Jack Mathession, 
Goerge Zoghby, Ed Hardin. 

Backgammon — Sean Ducleaux 

LEFT: Darrell Smith practices catching 
during pre-game. 

Photos by Eliseo Pitty 



69 



70 




PEOPLE 



Here, You're Not A Number 



"People . . . People who need people . . ." 
Okay, enough Barbra Stresand. But what she 
says is true. You shouldn't go through college 
alone. 

It's impossible to go through Spring Hill 
alone. The combination of a small school and 
a strong residential community created a tight 
knit student population. Some described it as 
intimate. Others called it suffocating. It really 
depended on what kind of day you were hav- 
ing. (And whether or not your dirty laundry 
had just became public knowledge.) 

Yet when students were asked why they 
chose Spring Hill, the overwhelming response 
was "I wanted to go to a small school." Some 
people complained how they got tired of look- 
ing at the same people every day in the 
cafeteria. Yet there was something special 
about recognizing another Springhillian in a 
different environment. They could've been 
walking down Bourbon Street in the French 
Quarter, waiting for a flight home in the Atlan- 
ta airport, or even dancing at a Mardi Gras 
ball. 

At Spring Hill, you may not be just a 
number. But at least you do count. 



JPW 

LEFT: Balloons, sunshine, and reunion got students and 
parents together over Parent's Weekend. Paige Danos 
and Alison Salloum enjoy the day. 



71 



o 



o 

</) 
\ 



Srte planned, organized, 

held the class together, 

But, she didn't let rain 

spoil her parade. 

MICHELE 
ZOGHBY 



It's a scientific fact that almost 
everyone gets "senioritis" in their eighth 
semester of college. As senior class 
president, Michelle Zoghby never had 
the chance to catch "the disease." 

Zoghby was elected to the task of 
coordinating the class of 1987's senior 
year. There were class parties to plan, 
the senior advisory board to assemble 
and coordinate, as well as overseeing 
Graduation Weekend. "I never knew 
there could be so much for one person to 
do," Zoghby said. 

The task was difficult. However, 
Zoghby handled everything, including a 
rained-out Graduation ceremony with 
style. "It was a lot of work, with a lot of 
responsibility," she said. "But, it's been a 
great year and if I had to do it all over 
again, I wouldn't change a thing. Yeah, 



seniors! 



By Scott Striplin 




* 



S 7/1 



72 




Keith Anderson 

Mobile 

Chris Arcement 

Mobile 

Jaime Betbeze 

Mobile 

Daniel Borst 

Crystal Springs, MS 



James Brady 
Pascagoula, MS 
B. Clark Brennan 
New Orleans, LA 
Erin Brennan 
Dunwoody, GA 
Glori Burch 
Mobile 



Herman Camacho 
Bolivia 

Adrian Colon 
New Orleans, LA 
Marc Colon 
Metairie, LA 
John Corr 
Terrac Park, OH 



John Cox 
Mobile 
Earl Crapps 
Anchorage, AL 
Brian Creely 
Hensley, AR 
Jennifer Crowley 
Potomac, MD 



Maggie Cunneen 
St. Petersburg, FL 
Elizabeth DeSmet 
Wayzata, MN 
J. Kevin Dize 
Mobile 

Danielle Donohue 
Suffern, NY 



CO 

cc 

o 

z 

UJ 



73 



CO 

o 

z 

LU 
CO 
\ 



Rob Dukes 

Mobile 

Richard Dukes 

Mobile 

Sheila Dunn 

New York, NY 

Arthur Estopian 

Miami, FL 



Sam Feibelman 

Mobile 

Michael Franck 

Mobile 

Stephanie Fretz 

New Orleans, LA 

David Fuchs 

Metairie, LA 



Phil Fusco 

Spring Valley, NY 

Chris Gabel 

Mobile 

Anton Garriz 

Mobile 

Beau Gaudet 

Lafayette, LA 



Richard Godlewski 

Biloxi, MS 

Jordi Guso 

Miami, FL 

Cynthia Hampton 

Biloxi, MA 

Hollie Harmon 

Cincinnati, OH 



Jodie Herbert 

Baton Rouge, LA 

Ramona Heil 

Des Plaines, IL 

Margaret Hudgins 

Mobile 

Shannon Hunt 

Dallas, TX 




74 




Wilda James 

Mobile 

Felecia Jernigon 

Mobile 

Grace Kelly 

Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 

Jeanne Kleinschmidt 

New Orleans, LA 



John Klosterman, III 

Mobile 

James Konicek 

Des Moines, IA 

Mike Leary 

Mobile 

Amanda Letchworth 

Shelby, MS 



Angie Levert 
Chalmette, LA 
James Lewis 
Mobile 
Juan Linares 
El Salvaor 
Joan Lund 
Biloxi, MS 



Bess Maclnnes 
Pascagoula, MS 
Michael Madaras 
Short Hill, NJ 
William Massey 
Escatawpa, MS 
Miles Maxwell 
Mobile 



Michael McCabe 

Memphis, TN 

Tanya McCarty 

Mobile 

Debra McCary 

Mobile 

Marc Micklewright 

Augusta, GA 



DC 
O 

z 

LU 



75 



DC 
O 



LU 
(0 



Phoebe Miller 

Cincinnati, OH 

Susan Miranda 

Remsenberg, NY 

Tom Mueller 

Mobile 

Monique Monteilh 

Crowley, LA 



Caffa Montgomery 

Mobile 

Mary Munn 

Mobile 

Ronald Nelson 

Mobile 

Denise O'Hallaron 

St. Louis, MO 



Monique Perry 

Covington, LA 

Sonya Pickett 

Montgomery 

Patricia Pon 

Mobile 

Molly Preston 

Trumbull, CT 



Michelle Prevost 

Centreville, MD 

Tamra Pulliam 

Robertsdale 

J. Phillip Ramsey 

Birmingham 

William Roohi 

Metairie, LA 



Marie Scavullo 

Augusta, GA 

Angie Shatas 

Huntsville 

Beth Ann Siemanski 

Nashville, TN 

Susanne Simmonds 

Mobile 




76 




Jaime Betbeze, 1987 class orator, presented 
this speech at the 1987 Graduation Ceremony. 
Because many people were unable to attend the 
ceremony, the speech is included in the 1987 
Torch. 

I stand before you now as the duly appointed 
orator of the senior class. It is a personal honor 
beyond compare, and one that I shall always 
cherish. I am overwhelmed that, after so many 
years of subjection to my dubious words of 
wisdom, through student forums and informal 
gatherings, and through my contributions to 
Spring Hill's illustrious underground newspaper, 
my friends and colleagues have seen fit to allow 
me one final word. Perhaps your strategy was 
the hope that, after I make my farewells, having 
the opportunity to say exactly what is on my 
mind, I shall be silenced henceforth and 
forevermore. But don't count on it. This little col- 
lege has not seen the last of me nor heard the 
last of my words. 

My mission, however, is not to say whatever is 
on my mind. My task is simple, straight-forward, 
and specific, yet very difficult to accomplish. My 
task is valedictory. As I said before, I am the 
representative of my class; I must attempt to say 
what is on everyone's mind. It is my duty to 
make our farewell — to our college, to our 
teachers, to our parents, and to each other. It is 
quite a tall order for a seven-minute speech. 
Perhaps that h why we feel compelled to return 
later this evening to this very Avenue, the sym- 
bol of our valediction, to make our farewells in a 
more appropriate manner. I shall attempt 
though, to say what must be said and to avoid 
saying what should not be said in the hope that 
most of you will hear my words and understand 
our thoughts. 

It is a common practice, on occasions such as 
this, to engage in retrospection, to reminisce 
upon those events which have culminated in 
this day. Last year, my good friend and brother, 



1 987 Class Orator 



JAIME BEBEZE 



Paul Gridley, spoke a great deal about change, 
and appropriately so. We witness so many 
changes in four years which have dramatic ef- 
fects upon our tiny campus: for example, the loss 
of our beloved shrine, the College Inn; the rise in 
the legal drinking age and the consequent 
speculation about a "new" alcohol policy; the 
rise and fall of a Dean for Students; the coming 
and going of young adults, and the making and 
losing of friends; even the complete removal of 
the entire campus from 4307 Old Shell Road to 
its present position at 4000 Dauphin Street. A lot 
can happen in four short years. 

I would like to speak at greater length, 
however, about those things which do not 
change. No matter how adventurous in our 
hearts or bold on our spirits we may be, we are 
all comforted by stability and continuity. There 
are certain things you know you can always 
count on: like not being able to study in Mobile 
Hall, and always being able to find a date in 
O'Leary; you can always count on Chief know- 
ing your name, even if he's never heard a word 
you've said. There will always be a Mr. Welch, 
who gives a superb lecture on the latest 
weapons systems or Richard Nixon's political 
blunders, never mind that the coure is on Argen- 
tine history: there will always be teachers from 
other countries whose English is excellent, but 
not up to the task of penetrating the mental fog 
that accompanies most students at 8:20 in the 
morning; and of course, there will always be 
liberals in the college, who insist on destroying 
permanence. We will always have a Sodality 
Chapel, the mobile Home of God, no matter 
where it may happen to be; we will always have 
beer for the asking, as long as you ask the right 
person; we will always have Mardi Gras on 
campus, and you will always have one teacher 
who writes, "B+, very nice," on every one of your 
papers. These memories and countless others, 
create a character, an atmosphere, which is 
uniquely Spring Hill. 



But as I glance over this list and with a 
little help from my friends, the realization 
strikes me that my meaning is not at all 
clear. What is it that makes Spring Hill so 
special? There are so many constant 
realities which permeate the atmosphere 
in such a way that we may never notice it, 
but an outsider could cut it with a knife. 
For an example, Spring Hill is southern. In 
my objective, or objectionable opinion, 
there is no better way to describe the 
hospitality you receive whenever you 
enter our gates. Spring Hill is Catholic 
and has been since its founding in 1830. I 
cannot describe to you in words the result 
of our religious affiliation, but you can feel 
it in the depth and power of a true friend- 
ship based on Christ's teachings of 
brotherly love. Spring Hill is Jesuit, which 
means more than being in the capable 
hands of the Jesuit fathers for 140 years. 
To be Jesuit means to be based on the Ig- 
natian principals of action "enlightened 
by unbiased reason and reasonable 
faith." Look around you now and see the 
product of their action — sincere effort to 
build a better world, a true kingdom of 
God. These things are what make Spring 
Hill special — these things which have 
been our world, part of the real world, for 
the past four years. Despite our 
grievances, though they may be many, 
we do love this place; we love these peo- 
ple; we love Spring Hill. Therefore, I urge 
upon those who control her to recognize 
our feelings and respect them as sacred. 
Spring Hill does not belong to us. She 
belongs in our hearts; she belongs in our 
heads; and we shall never lose sight of 
our esteem, our gratitude and our love. 
The feelings we hold for Spring Hill shall 
never change. 



o 



o 

a. 



77 





'■ '."-■,' • ; v : .■:■:.'., 


Class of 1 987 1 


Miriam Ackels 


Elizabeth Walden 


Therese Anderson 


Faye Whatley 


Robert Barnett 


Daniel Wolter 


Laura Bearden 


Jennifer Zitnik 


Christina Bearinger 


Mary C. Koch 


Lisa Bennett 


James Lamoureaux 


Ann Bibber 


Mary Kay Lanham 


Brady Bragg 


Andrew Lawler 


Edward Brinson 


Samantha Lilley 


Gregory Brown 


Marianne Lott 


Patrick Carolin 


Christine Maier 


Daniel Coddington 


James McCausland 


Sean Connery 


Greg McClellan 


George Conroy 


Shannon McClain 


Monica Davidson 


Amy Midkif f 


Spencer Davis 


William Miller 


Manuel DeyCaza 


Morgan Milne 


Manuel Dejuan 


Michael Mitchner 


Cheryl Del Bueno 


John Mooney 


Annette Dukes 


Joseph Nero 


Alice Dumas 


Richard Novey 


Edward Frost 


Maureen O'Donnell 


Martha Fuchs 


Barbara Ogier 


Stephen Gouner 


Thad Owings 


Patricia Grabfelder 


Theresa Papa 


Monique Gray 


Mary Peoples 


KimGriller 


Leslie Peterson 


Jose Habet 


Eliseo Pitty 


Robert Hall 


Victoria Pollard 


Linda Hamilton 


Janice Raggi 


Catherine Hanley 


Roy Ralston 


Jeff Hartley 


Janine Rapier 


Robert Janicke 


Paula Richardson 


Mark Jeansomme 


Carol Riddell 


David Juddis 


Bruce Earl Rogers 


Margie Kane 


Mary Roney 


Clarence Keller 


Luis Salazar 


Jackie Klock 


David Slepian 


Mark Kobelja 


Brian Snediker 


Greg Towle 


Kathleen Snyder 


Gregory Tynan 


Thomas Spiriti 


Stephen Van Drisse 


Robyn Stinnett 


Paula Vega 


Robert Tempest 


Yvonne Vrouwenvelde 


Paula Tiernan 



78 




ennifer Sincell 
Tampa, FL 
Kathy Sisterman 
Huntsville 

Mary Beth Slaughter 
Gulfport, MS 
John Stebor 
Lantana, FL 



Scott Striplin 
Mobile 
Jackie Swift 
Chicago, IL 
Monica Thelen 
Lakeside Park, KY 
Angela Torres 
New Orleans, LA 



Stephanie Treutel 
Mobile 
Paula Vega 
Metairie, LA 
Julie Vignes 
Baton Rouge, LA 
Kelen Vorback 
Spring Lake, NJ 



Marti Weis 
Potomac, MD 
Cae Williams 
New Orleans, LA 
Becky Williams 
Mobile 

Mary Jane Zacchea 
Floral Park, NY 



Michele Zoghby 
Mobile 



g 

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79 



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Open-Door Policy 

leads SGA 

President 

to the Top 

MIRIAM 

What kind of person would take on a 
virtually 24-hour-a-day job with very 
little pay, and no reward ... a job 
which involved being responsible for 
just about everything which affects the 
student body ... A job which entails 
dealing with one problem after 
another? The position which I am talk- 
ing about is Student Government 
Association President. According to 
SGA President, Miriam Ackels, the key 
is to look at things not as problems, but 
as challenges. 

Being involved in SGA for the past 
two years had shown Miriam some 
weaknesses in the SGA system. She 
was concerned with letting the student 
body know that the door to SGA was 
open. To do this, she instituted regular 
surveys to find out what the student 
body wanted. This helped to break 
down some of the barriers between 
the student body and its elected 
representatives. Earth Day, was a 
good example of student input in 
action. 

Miriam felt that her SGA experience 
was something she would recommend 
to any student. "I would suggest Stu- 
dent Government involvement for 
everyone. It has something for 
everyone to help them prepare for the 
real world. The main idea, though, is 
that you have to get involved." 



ACKELS 



w m | 




**> % 





80 




Leslie Abadie, fr 
Cecilia Ackels, jr 
Tiffany Acousta, jr 
Amy Anderson, so 



Frank Anderson, fr 
Roy Anderson, fr 
Jim Andrews, fr 
Steve Ailing, jr 



Russ Barakat, fr 
Sam Bauer, so 
Madeline Barnes, fr 
Joseph Barras, fr 



Bryan Barrett, fr 
Sean Barry, so 
Benjie Belen, so 
Richard Bendano, fr 



Leanne Berg, so 
Germaine Billeaud, so 
John Bishop, so 
Sabin Bokus, so 



CO 

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o 

DC 
Ul 

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S 3 



81 



LU 

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o 

DC 
LU 
Q 



fr 
sd 

^ 

^ 



Amy Bonness, fr 

Chris Boudreaux, so 

Bridget Boyle, so 

John Breen, so 



April Brister, so 

David Britt, fr 

Elizabeth Brocato, jr 

Patty Bullington, fr 



Anna Bush, jr 

Michael Busteed, jr 

Meg Byrne, fr 

Lisa Cade, fr 



Monica Cano, jr 

James Carlisle, jr 

Marianne Carlisle, jr 

Leslie Carr, jr 



Marie Carrington, jr 

Brian Carroll, fr 

James Cazayoux, so 

Christine Cefalu, so 




82 




Denise Clark, fr 
Tim Clarke, jr 
Mary E. Cole, jr 
Kelly Collins, so 



Jorge Cos, fr 
Kevin Cottrell, fr 
Kelley Cowley, jr 
Raleigh Cox, fr 



Tammi Cramer, so 
Stasia Crispin, so 
Rebecca Crow, jr 
Carlos Cuadrado, so 



Katherine Culhane, jr 
Stefanie Cunningham, fr 
Marianne Currie, so 
Paul Cussen, so 



Tamara Daffin, jr 
Jennifer Darling, fr 
Angele Davis, fr 
Brenna Denton, fr 



LU 

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83 



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Suzanne Doerer, jr 

Babs Dufour, so 

Thomas Dunn, fr 

Tracy Driscoll, jr 



Scott Eastin, fr 

Daniel Egbert, fr 

Susan Elcan, fr 

Stacy Elias, fr 



Neal Elliott, fr 

Madeline Elzen, so 

Richard Englebert, jr 

Dino Entac, jr 



Glen Estopinal, jr 

Kristen Fabing, fr 

Sharon Falconer, fr 

Jennifer Farmer, fr 



Tyrene Fayard, fr 

Patrick Feehan, fr 

Victor Fetter, fr 

Catherine Foote, so 




84 



ANGELA 




Weathering the 

winds 

of change, she 

made it 

through two years 

as 

ISC President, 

TORRES 

Angela Torres served as president 
of Spring Hill's Inter-Sorority Council 
for two consecutive years. 

Angela viewed working with ISC as 
a positive experience because of the 
leadership skills it helped her to 
develop. 

Under her leadership, ISC has seen 
a lot of changes, including the addi- 
tion of a new national sorority and the 
transition of the council from a local 
board to a national Panhellenic 
organization. 

It seems apparent that the other 
members of the board appreciated 
Angela's hard work. They selected her 
for the 1986-87 ISC Award. 

By Scott Striplin 






O 

Q. 



85 



UJ 

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Jane Ford, jr 

Mena Ford, fr 

Cathleen Foster, so 

John Foxworth, jr 



Daniel Fries, so 

Nicholas Gachassin, so 

Jeff Gadapee, so 

Anne Marie Gambel, so 



Tracey Gerchow, fr 

Spencer Gillen, so 

Christine Ginn, jr 

Susann Goff, jr 



Scott Gomez, so 

Mary Gormandy, so 

Patrick Graham, fr 

Beth Greenwood, jr 



Victoria Guarisco, jr 

Roger Guizado, fr 

Jorge Guizano, so 

Laurie Gulley, jr 





Kathleen Haas, fr 
Kristen Habert, so 
Pat Haggerty, fr 
Renee Halphen, fr 



Bessie Ham, jr 
Keith Hammett, jr 
Edward Hardin, fr 
Karen Haynes, so 



John Henderson, fr 
Paul Herring, jr 
Cade Herzog, fr 
Alisa Hettenhausen, so 



Karen Hoffman, fr 
Doug Hallo well, jr 
Hyatt Hood, jr 
Wendy Home, fr 



Byron House, so 
Jim House, so 
Erin Hoyt, fr 
Tonia Hubbard, jr 



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87 



VICTOR 



l- 



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Freshman makes 

first year, the prime time 

to start involvement 



FE 



ER 



Some people relax their freshman 
year. They kind of take a year to ad- 
just to their new surroundings, to get to 
know difficult teachers and all the 
other things that go along with a 
freshman year. Victor Fetter, however, 
started his freshman year, off with a 
burst of energy. He became a member 
of the Springhillians and of the Spring 
Hill Orientation Week Executive 
Board. 

Fetter felt that his involvement in 
these groups helped him to get to 
know the campus better. "I like to get 
the ball rolling," Fetter said. "I didn't 
want to waste a year looking around, 
but to get involved." 

Through his involvement, Fetter felt 
he could increase involvement on 
campus. "By doing something myself I 
hope to set a good example. If 
everyone would get involved, we 
wouldn't have to a campus," Fetter 
said. 

Fetter felt that student involvement 
and opinions better campus life. "My 
becoming involved voices my opinion. 
Student opinions are needed. It never 
hurts to have more opinions thrown 
around, "he said. 



88 




Elaine Hudson, fr 
Mark Hunt, so 
James Hutchins, jr 
Matt Hutchinson, fr 



Richard Inge, jr 
Michelle IshJer, fr 
Joycelyn Jackson, jr 
Jill Janick, fr 



Ila Jehl, fr 
Ginny Johnson, fr 
John Johnson, jr 
Laura Joyner, so 



Eric Kavagh, fr 
William Kelly, fr 
Claudia Kennedy, fr 
Kip Kemolde, jr 



Todd Killingsworth, so 
Bill King, jr 
Betsy King, jr 
Michael Kintz, so 



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89 



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Theresa Kircher, jr 

Tammy Kirksey, jr 

Christopher Klein, jr 

Mike Knobloch, so 



William Lagman, fr 

Ted Lander, fr 

Joe Lange, fr 

Mary Kay Lange, fr 



Pete Larkin, so 

Lisa Lavergne, fr 

Frank Lemm, fr 

Mollie Letchworth, jr 



Rosemary Liberti, so 

Frances Little, fr 

Pam Little, jr 

Walter Little, jr 



Laura Livaudais, jr 

Stella Livingston, jr 

John Lontz, fr 

Tom Lowenstein, fr 




90 




Mark Lyman, jr 
Kelly Lynch, fr 
Sean Lynch, fr 
Molly Maclnnes, fr 



Mark Macnamara, so 
Michelle Magruder, fr 
Raymond Maquire, fr 
Rosemary Majoue, jr 



Frank Maples, so 
Mary Marfice, jr 
Jim Marren, jr 
Jackie Martin, so 



Megan Martin, so 
Michael Mathews, fr 
Brian Maxwell, so 
Mike McAleer, so 



John McCarrick, fr 
Alan McCory, jr 
Annette McGill, so 
Charles McGraw, fr 



HI 

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91 



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-a. 



Mary McGraw, so 

Michael McKinley, fr 

Lori McLaughlin, jr 

John McMahon, fr 



Kevin McMahon, fr 

Tim McNair, fr 

Ricardo Mendoza, jr 

Manny Menedez, so 



Kirsten Meyer, fr 

Anne Meyers, jr 

Celeste Michaelis, jr 

Robert Middendorf, fr 



John Miliziano, jr 

Leslie Millin, fr 

Krista Mingus, jr 

Andrew Minigutti, fr 



Lisa Murphy, fr 

Karen Murray, so 

Thomas Nee, jr 

Darla Nelson, fr 




92 



It's seven a.m. on a Saturday morn- 
ing in November. In a dorm room in 
Walsh Hall, an alarm clock goes off. 
The sleeping student presses the 
snooze button and gets ten minutes of 
undisturbed sleep. Ten minutes later, 
the alarm goes off again, but this time 
his roommate yells across the room, 
"Mike, get up!" Michael Knobloch 
needs to get up because on that day, 
he was in charge of Spring Hill's Mini- 
Special Olympics. 

That day, residents from the Albert 
Brewer Developmental Center came 
to campus to participate in the Mini- 
Special Olympics. Most of the par- 
ticipants were mentally handicapped. 
Because of this, special games were 
designed to fit their needs. The event 
was a success largely due to Mike's 
leadership and organizational 
abilities. 

The Mini-Special Olympics was just 
one of the service projects that Mike 



MICHAEL 




Leadership and 
organizational 
skills help student to 
help others. 

KNOBLOCH 

was involved with over the last year. 
He was in charge of service projects 
for the Sigma Chi fraternity, helping 
the elderly at the Waunham Health 
Care Unit to answer phones, and 
answering phones for the MDA 
Telethon. Because of his leadership 
and his unselfish desire to help peo- 
ple, the Sigma Chi fraternity ac- 
cumulated 200 hours of service to the 
community. 

Mike feels that he enjoys the helping 
aspects of the projects. "I do it because 
it brings joy to the people we help," he 
said. 

On March 15, 1987, Mike was 
rewarded publicly for his efforts. He 
received the 1987 Outreach Award for 
his service to the community. 



By Mark Hunt 



(D 



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93 



LU 

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CO 

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LU 

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Hunter Nelson, jr 

Joe Nesser, jr 

Lizzi Neuman, so 

Carolyn Nieman, jr 



Jean Nino, fr 

Colleen O'Brien, so 

Jay Olinde, fr 

Kym O'Neal, fr 



Stacy Orgeron, so 

Robin Orleski, fr 

Todd Owens, fr 

Henry Owings, fr 



Cara Parillo, jr 

Rebecca Paterson, fr 

Cecilia Peavy, fr 

Bemaldino Belize, jr 



Suzanne Pechuls, so 

Peyton Peek, fr 

Mary Peiler, fr 

Sandra Pence, so 



94 





John Pendergrass, jr 
Stephen Perrault, fr 
Danny Perry, fr 
Kathy Phelen, jr 



Ross Phelps, jr 
Davidcia Pickett, fr 
Mark Pietri, so 
Anne Pigott, fr 



Amardo Fitters, fr 
Chris Powell, fr 
Lance Price, fr 
Benton Pratt, so 



Mike Pusatera, jr 
Diana Rayfield, fr 
Andrew Renard, jr 
Robert Reuter, so 



* <* 



y * t m m 



Edward Rice, jr 
Patrick Rice, fr 
Philip Rielly, so 
Hilda Rodriguez, jr 



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95 



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SHOW 87' Chair 

Makes 

Preparations for 

Onslaught of New 

Students GINA 

TIMPHONY 



Every fall, the first big event new 
students attend, is Spring Hill Orienta- 
tion Week. One person who has been 
a part of the Orientation staff, is Gina 
Timphony. Gina has completed some 
of the "nuts and bolts" operations of 
SHOW, such as typing name tags, 
creating posters, etc. However, all of 
this effort has paid off and Gina was 
selected to be the chairwoman of 
SHOW 1987. 

In planning for 1987, Gina's goal 
was to increase understanding be- 
tween campus groups. "I was con- 
cerned with the unity between groups 
which are involved in SHOW. My big- 
gest concern was the role the peer 
counselors play in Orientation. I 
wanted to improve that are." 

Although many plans for SHOW are 
completed in the spring semester 
preceding Orientation, Gina felt the 
SHOW staff was prepared to complete 
last minute tasks, just days before. "It's 
a tradition to leave a lot of things to be 
done in the fall," she said. "But the 
staff has gotten along very well so far, 
and I think everything will turn out 
okay." 




96 




Marc Rodriquez, fr 
Allison Roohi, fr 
Kristi Roper, fr 
Karen Roth, jr 



Andrew Rothfusz, fr 
Catherine Ryan, fr 
Michelle Ryan, so 
Alison Salloum, jr 



Frances Sanders, fr 
Barbara Savage, so 
Carrie Savage, fr 
Tim Savage, so 



John Schlesinger, so 
Angela Schuler, jr 
Barry Sevin, jr 
Shay Sharpe, jr 



Jill Shinault, fr 
Cheryl Siemanski, fr 
Stacie Sierra, so 
Deborah Simmons, so 



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97 



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Paul Simon, fr 

Ann Smith, fr 

George Smith, fr 

Marianne Sowa, so 



Paul Stockton, fr 

John Stone, fr 

Shannon Storm, so 

Molly Strain, fr 



Win Stuardi, fr 

Paul Stula, fr 

Ron Teasdale, so 

Tinerfe Tejera, fr 



Todd Thayer, jr 

Jon Thelen, jr 

Gina Timphony, jr 

Anh Tran, so 



Treg Tremont, fr 

Marian Tucei, so 

Stephan Tunstall, jr 

Peter Van Bueren, fr 



98 





Walter Van 
Hauwermeiren, jr 
Billy Vaudry, so 
Victor Vignes, so 
Craig Viscardi, jr 



Carol Wachter, fr 
Karen Waddick, fr 
Lisa Wallis, so 
Bridgid Walsh, jr 



Deborah Ward, fr 
Matthew Warren, fr 
Tom Watkins, jr 
Susan Watts, fr 



John Weithers, f r 
Deidre West, f r 
Stefanie Wientjes, jr 
Kathy Williams, jr 



Kim Williams, jr 
Anne Wingenter, so 
Clare Winter, so 
Mark Wojciechowski, jr 



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LJJ 



John Wolfarth, jr 

Amy Woods, so 

Cindy Wunsch, fr 

Donald Young, fr 




George Zoghby, jr 




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RIGHT: Kristen Habert and Marian Tucei's 
ceiling was a collection of "rare" art and 
comments. 



ir 



100 



They like to 

make 

their room, their 

l^dio-tcni uadcdt home away 

KRISTEN HABERT f r0 mhome 



i MARIAN 
f3 TUCEI 




The door which guards room 314 of 
Toolen Hall may look ordinary, inno- 
cent, even boring, but the room which 
is hidden behind it is another story. 
Room 314, the "Ponderosa" is the col- 
lege home of Kristen Habert and 
Marian Tucei. 

It is a room which is made up of 
various collections or memorabilia 
from the occupants' college years. 
Posters, Mardi Gras throws, teddy 
bears, etc. have found their way into 
room 314. To some, the room may 
seem cluttered, but not to Tucei and 
Habert. "We are fun, wild people. We 
like to always have something new 
added to the room," they said. "Each 
thing upon the walls, has a memory. 
People even come here to cheer up," 
Tucei added. 

To the residents, the room is a 
resource, which is very organized. 
"This is designated clutter," Habert 



said. "We know where everything is." 

Tucei felt that the room was special. 
"It feels like your room at home — not 
a dorm room," she said. 

The roommates feel that the room is 
a test of their independence. "Our 
parents would never let us keep our 
rooms like this. We would never let our 
kids keep their room like this," Habert 
said. 

At times, they have developed 
themes for the room, such as the 
"Ponderosa" and "It's a Black Tie 
Event." "We have fun with this, we call 
it the Ponderosa because in this room, 
we ponder," she added jokingly. 

Through all the clutter, the friend- 
ship has held together. "We roomed, 
studied, and partied together. We 
drove each other crazy, and we've 
kept each other sane," Tucei said, 
"But, we've never had a roommate 
conflict!" 



o 



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a. 



101 




102 



SPORTS 

Badgers One, Badgers All, Let's all do the Badger Call 



Without a place to really call home 
court, the Badger Sports program 
often lacked school spirit. Borrowing a 
gym from St. Paul's School was as 
close as the basketball teams could 
come to having a home court advan- 
tage, although some students man- 
aged to take their place alongside "the 
Pit" during baseball games. 

All of the teams tried to stay afloat in 
a year without winning seasons. If 
anything, 1987 was a year of building 
within Badger Sports. 



LEFT: Attempting a backhand, Monica Thelen returns a 
difficult shot. 



103 




Mens' Basketball finishes 
with 20- 13 Overall Record 



RIGHT: Avoiding a block, Chris Nelson takes an 
inside shot. 

BELOW: Making a run through the lane, Darin 
Tang tosses one in against Xavier. 





104 






Mens' Basketball 




20-13 




97 


LaGrange 


87 


109 


Pensacola Christian 


78 


64 


Montevallo 


74 


94 


Southern N.O. 


88 


84 


Southwestern Texas 


77 


76 


Texas Wesleyan 


95 


81 


Austin College 


72 


2 


Arlington Baptist 





84 


Birmingham Southern 


80 


88 


LaGrange 


74 


65 


Birmingham Southern 


82 


77 


Southern N.O. 


75 


74 


Faulkner 


96 


89 


Miles 


58 


78 


Morris Brown 


85 


126 


Stillman 


114 


69 


Montevallo 


62 


108 


Dillard 


91 


78 


Belhaven 


67 


83 


William Carey 


90 


73 


Tougaloo 


70 


94 


Xavier 


98 


87 


Faulkner 


77 


91 


Louisiana College 


72 


59 


Mobile College 


56 


68 


Dillard 


71 


63 


Belhaven 


56 


62 


William Carey 


65 


104 


Pensacola Christian 


64 


90 


Tougaloo 


91 


65 


Xavier 


78 


83 


Louisiana College 


82 


74 


Mobile College 


76 


71 


William Carey 


72 



(forfeit) 



OT 



OT 




TOP: Running circles around the defense, Chris 
Nelson takes a shot off the backboard. 

LEFT: Mens' Basketball — Front Row: Darin 
Tang, Steve Gouner, Chris Williams, Leve Lat- 
son, Mike McKinley, Chris Nelson, Brian Dennis. 
Row 2: Tom Thelen, Anthony Harris, Tom 
Thomas, Doug Hollowell, James Brandyburg, 
Richard Vidoli, Roy Ralston. 



105 




Womens' Basketball Team 
Makes Efforts to Improve 




RIGHT: Womens' Basketball — Front Row: 
Coach Pam Young, Frances Sanders, Deanne 
Neyrey, Deborah Simmons, Tammy Ardoin. 
Row 2: Peyton Peek, Anita Union, Angele Davis, 
Ashley Gomillion, Janice Porter. 




106 






Women's Basketball 






7-18 




59 


Southern N.O. 


64 


58 


West Florida 


67 


63 


Auburn-Montgomery 


74 


69 


Jacksonville 


73 


54 


Blackburn 


42 


75 


Flagler 


58 


95 


Tampa Univ. 


99 


95 


Southern N.O. 


91 


98 


Florida Memorial 


71 


76 


Jacksonville 


72 


74 


Dillard 


83 


64 


Belhaven 


77 


59 


William Carey 


90 


65 


Tougaloo 


57 


66 


Xavier 


79 


50 


West Florida 


83 


66 


Louisiana College 


74 


50 


Dillard 


101 


39 


Belhaven 


49 


74 


William Carey 


87 


62 


Auburn-Montgomery 


82 


58 


Tougaloo 


73 


48 


Xavier 


63 


86 


Talladega 


56 


56 


Louisiana College 


58 


M 


\\ ITV- ' 






107 




v 

\ ■ 

i v 






Baseball Team works to 
hold its own in League 




A fc 







ABOVE: Baseball — Front Row: Lance Price, Matt Maurin, Scott Chavrs, Britt Baxter, Victor Altamirano, Keith Walker, John Zollinger, Robert Moore. 
Row 2: Coach Pete Phillips, Ken Ashiem, Win Stuardi, Joe Barras, Tom Lowenstein, Rob Cronin, Mark Fincher, Rob Brown, Dale Shirley, Pat 
Graham, Glen Estopinal, John Lontz, Head Coach Frank Sims, Bat Boy "Zach". 



108 













/<£/£* 




w^* '• ^J 




-.' ■ - 







Baseball 






17-27-2 




6 


Southern Mississippi 


5 


4 


Huntingdon 


3 


6 


Huntingdon 


4 


5 


Troy State 


3 





Troy State 





8 


Southeastern 


2 


6 


Southeastern 


5 


6 


Samford 


5 


5 


Montevallo 


4 


5 


Montevallo 


3 


13 


Christian Brothers 


2 


6 


Christian Brothers 


7 


11 


William Carey 


5 


7 


William Carey 


2 


10 


William Carey 


2 


11 


Milliken 


10 


8 


Milliken 


8 


5 


Faulkner 


4 


5 


Louisiana College 


4 


4 


Louisiana College 


3 


9 


Louisiana College 


7 


17 


Southwest Baptist 


3 


6 


Lambuth 


4 


8 


Columbus 


1 


9 


Belhaven 


7 


7 


Belhaven 


5 


9 


Belhaven 


6 


11 


William Carey 


4 


8 


William Carey 


5 


8 


William Carey 


7 


10 


Southeastern 


2 


9 


Southeastern 





9 


Louisiana College 


1 


7 


Louisiana College 


4 


9 


Louisiana College 


8 


11 


Rhodes 


4 


8 


Rhodes 


7 


11 


Tulane 


1 


5 


Belhaven 


2 


16 


Belhaven 


7 


15 


Belhaven 


11 


1 


Birmingham Southern 


10 


2 


Birmingham Southern 


21 


10 


West Florida 


1 


8 


West Florida 


5 



TOP CENTER: Pitcher Victor AJtamirano winds 
up for the pitch in hopes to get the third strike. 
LEFT: Hoping to beat the steal, Rob Brown waits 
for the ball in pre-season play. 



109 





Mens' Tennis 




Score 




W-L 


9-0 


Birmingham Southern 


0-1 


9-0 


Samford 


0-2 


8-1 


Okloosa- Walton 


1-2 


9-0 


Mobile College 


1-3 


7-2 


Belhaven 


1-4 


8-1 


Southern Mississippi 


1-5 


7-2 


Southern N.O. 


2-5 


9-0 


Oklahoma Baptist 


2-6 


8-1 


Jacksonville 


2-7 


6-3 


Livingston 


2-8 


8-1 


David Lipscomb 


2-9 


9-0 


Jefferson Davis J.C. 


3-9 


8-1 


Mobile College 


3-10 


7-2 


Southern Mississippi 


3-12 


5-4 


Huntingdon 


3-13 


8-0 


Marion Institute 


4-13 


8-1 


Livingston 


4-14 


8-1 


Jefferson Davis J.C. 


5-14 


9-0 


William Carey 
Womens' Tennis 


6-14 


Score 




W-L 


6-3 


Birmingham Southern 


0-1 


5-2 


Samford 


1-1 


5-4 


New Orleans Univ. 


1-2 


8-1 


Southern N.O. 


2-2 


7-2 


Millsaps 


3-2 


8-1 


West Florida 


3-3 


6-3 


Southern Mississippi 


3-4 


6-0 


Southern N.O. 


4-4 


6-3 


Creighton 


4-5 


7-2 


Jacksonville 


5-5 


8-1 


Freed Hardeman 


6-5 


6-3 


Southeastern 


6-6 


8-1 


David Lipscomb 


7-6 


8-1 


Jefferson Davis J.C. 


8-6 


6-3 


Mobile College 


8-7 


6-6 


Huntingdon 


8-8 


5-4 


New Orleans Univ. 


9-8 


7-2 


Nichols 


9-9 


8-1 


Jefferson Davis J.C. 


10-9 


CENTER RIGHT: Jumping into her serve. 


Kathy 


Hanley stretches to keep it within the court. 




110 



Tennis Teams go up 
Against Tough Competition 





3P1 

LEFT: Men's Tennis Team — Front Row: Ted 

Hyle, Lionel Jacob, Jim Marren, Bob Sombothy. 

Row 2: Bryan Barrett, Dan Fries, John Breen, 

Coach Pat Harlan. 



LEFT: Womens' Tennis Team — Front Row: 
Shannon Hunt, Lori McLaughlin, Kerry Bordes, 
Colleen Madden, Danielle Donohue. Row 2: 
Coach Pat Harlin, Kristi Roper, Grace Kelly, 
Kathy Hanley, Monica Thelen, Coach Lynn 
Renchard. 



Ill 




Golf Team participates 

but fails to place 

in 1987 Tournament Season 



Golf 

Play Schedule 

Univ. of Tampa 

Huntington 

New Orleans Univ. 

Spring Hill College 

ACJC Southern JR-SR 

Huntingdon 

NAIA District 30 



m 




112 




/ 



•V ■;?•*■, 



LEFT: In the ACJC Southern, Junior-Senior 
Tournament, Chris Klein swings and in photo to the 
right, watches his ball mark on the green. 
BELOW: In attempt to par, Tim Lane putts. 







113 




FAR RIGHT: Acting as coxswain, 
Paula Richardson guides her crew 
down Dog River and out to the Bay. 
RIGHT: Guiding a shell to the River 
takes patience. Maria Fater directs 
her crew. 



ABOVE: Ultimate Frisbee Team — Front Row: Michael Olinde, Craig Viscardi, Andrew Renard, Pat Hickey, Dan 
Englebert. Row 2: Paul Supick, Richard Hart, Robert Barnett, Brian Maxwell, Tim Savage, John Corr. 



114 




Ultimate Frisbee Team 
and Crew Team 
Build Programs 




115 



/ 



3*s 

V 



'■■ \ 



RIGHT: Preparing to sail, Eric Doyle and Sam 

Feibelman launch their boat. 

LEFT: Beating their teammates around the race 

course, Joan Ferretti and Adam White make the 

curve. 

BELOW: Joan Ferretti and Adam White race to 

round the point in a daily practice. 






■v. 



\ 






■is 



I 





116 




It 



>>*i i& 1 



i .t.v ' > :■ \ > > ■ 




Sailing Regatta Schedule 

Single-Handed Districts — Tulane 

Sloop Districts — Southern Methodist 

ICYRA Sloop Championship — Detroit 

Tulane Fall Invitational 

ICYRA Single Handed National 

Championships 

Timme Angstien Memorial Regatta — 

Chicago 

Sugar Bowl Regatta — Tulane 

Nelson Rolsch Memorial Regatta — 

Tulane 

Dingy Qualifier — Spring Hill 

Dingy Qualifier — Tulane 



117 



Staying Competitive, 

Rugby and Soccer 

Make it on their Own 



RIGHT: Tim McNair attempts to 

kick the ball past a team member 

in a practice session 

BELOW: Leaping to bump the ball 

into the goal, Enricho's attempt is 

blocked by the defense. 





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ABOVE: Diving for the ball, the 
SHC Rugby Team tries to get 
possession. 



ABOVE: Rugby Team — Front Row: John McMahon, Michael Tusak, John Brophy, Walter Little, John Carroll, Paul 
Fellinger, Larry Druhan. Row 2: Yukinori Orihara, Ron Teasdale, John Olinde, Steven Mayronne, Phillip 
Callobre, Dennis Blaike, Tom Dulske, Jim Farrell. Row 3: Masakazu Ebara. 



119 



WITH A TWIST 

How do you make a year like 1986-87? 
Take three parts confusion, (over the alcohol 
policy, administrative changes, and the 
Avenue party). Mix with one part Mardi Gras 
revelry. Stir well, (Do not Shake). And gar- 
nish with one overstuffed Chapel on a rainy 
Mother's Day. 

Together, these elements blended to form 
a powerful school year. We went through a 
Dean For Students, and a downtown luxury 
hotel. The crowds turned out for Parents' 
Weekend, but slept in for the the games of 
Oktoberfest. We asked, Is there Life Alter 
High School?, and discovered we could sur- 
vive by The Skin of Our Teeth. 

It was definitely a strong year. Strong feel- 
ings, strong statements, strong threats. 
Planned Parenthood ads were banned from 
The Descent from the Hill, but sat on the rack 
in USA Today. The pool was open Easter 
weekend, but the Library was closed. 

What were our priorities? Where were we 
going? Did we know? Did we care? It was a 
turbulent year of Transitions. 

RIGHT: The Spring Hill College Sailing Team practices near the 

Mobile Yacht Club. 
BELOW: Archie Anderson shows how to correctly eat a crawfish. 






120 




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122 




WRAP-UF 

For a good many of you, this was 
the second yearbook you received in 
one year. Didn't make sense, did it? 

Well, for those of you following the 
Torch saga (and there aren't too many 
of you out there,) things were just as 
peculiar. You've heard my ramblings 
of looking for office space, switching 
publishers, and changing advisors. All 
that's old news. 

Instead, I've got a new message. A 
torch to carry, so to speak. (Every pun 
intended.) Problems like those above 
were conquered. Our new challenge 
may not be. 

The Torch needs people. People to 
write, design, and photograph. In 
short, people to create. What does it 
take to get Spring Hill students to get 
involved? The rewards are rich, the 
experience great, and the book couid 
be fantastic. 

We've been trying for three years 
now. And we'll keep trying. But we're 
not going to do it alone, not anymore. 

JPW 




TORCH 



Spring Hill College 
Mobile, Alabama 
Volume 65